ATLA April 2012 : Page 74

Men of Style By Lydia Martin and Stephanie Davis Smith Photography by Derek Blanks Shot on location at Kolo Collection Grooming by Nyssa Green and Jacquelyn Taylor for The Green Room Agency Man Power No longer are coiffed fauxhawks or skinny jeans the only signs that a man is a fashionable breed apart. Style now—as our Men of Style clearly show—is about Southern sophistication and a little something more. Here, our picks for the best dressed men in Atlanta, in their own dapper duds. Sid Mashburn ”The whole no-socks thing,” says Mashburn, “the Italians got that from the Southerners. We invented that easy style.” The Westside men’s boutique owner should know: He’s from the delta country. “I’m from Brandon, Miss. Our town had 1,500 people and one red light.” But a small town upbringing didn’t stop an 8-year-old Sid from getting interested in fashion and moving to Manhattan after graduating from Ole Miss. “Dressing up mentally changes you,” says Mashburn. “People dress down too much. I see a guy at church with cargo shorts, and I’m like, ‘C’mon man. Don’t play to the lowest common denominator.’” As a father of five girls, men’s clothes are important to Mashburn. “That’s why I have a men’s store,” he says. “I”m surrounded by too much estrogen.” First Major Fashion Purchase “A pair of English cap-toe boots in New York City. ” On Mashburn Suit, shoes and pocket square all by Sid Mashburn. The Goods $3,500, Summit X lounge chair 74 | | April 2012

Man Power

Lydia Martin And Stephanie Davis Smith

No longer are coiffed fauxhawks or skinny jeans the only signs that a man is a fashionable breed apart. Style now—as our Men of Style clearly show—is about Southern sophistication and a little something more.Here, our picks for the best dressed men in Atlanta, in their own dapper duds.<br /> <br /> Sid Mashburn<br /> <br /> ”The whole no-socks thing,” says Mashburn, “the Italians got that from the Southerners. We invented that easy style.” The Westside men’s boutique owner should know: He’s from the delta country. “I’m from Brandon, Miss. Our town had 1,500 people and one red light.” But a small town upbringing didn’t stop an 8-year-old Sid from getting interested in fashion and moving to Manhattan after graduating from Ole Miss.“Dressing up mentally changes you,” says Mashburn. “People dress down too much. I see a guy at church with cargo shorts, and I’m like, ‘C’mon man. Don’t play to the lowest common denominator.’” As a father of five girls, men’s clothes are important to Mashburn.“That’s why I have a men’s store,” he says. “I”m surrounded by too much estrogen.”<br /> <br /> Mark Boomershine<br /> <br /> Like most men, prior to going to a Southern university, Boomershine had his own sense of style.“My fashion epiphany came after I graduated from The University of Alabama,” says the artist, who opened a show at Matre Gallery last month.<br /> “In college, I was part of that whole conformist thing. Afterwards, I came to appreciate my inherent quirkiness and that began to come out again a bit.” It all started when he took his wife, Cinda, for her 30th birthday to Palm Springs, Calif. “We were at the Trina Turk boutique and I found these paisley pants, and I don’t know… they just felt like me,” he says. “They started it all.” He felt like himself again.Now he shops when he travels. “Because you dedicate the time to it.” Born and raised in Atlanta, Boomershine has no one set style. “I’m like a bee playing with style pollen from all different places,” he says. “When I get back to the hive, I have a little L. A., NYC and international fashion with me.”<br /> <br /> Don Purcell<br /> <br /> ”Yes,” sighs Don Purcell, general manager of Jeffrey Atlanta, “I managed the store in New York when they did the [Jimmy Fallon] Saturday Night Live spoof on Jeffrey.” Purcell has worked for the company for 17 years both in New York and Atlanta, after first working at a store in Charleston owned by Bob Ellis (Jeffrey Kalinksy’s father). “I’m originally from Ridgeway, Va., population 200,” says Purcell. A place that wasn’t exactly fashion-forward. Purcell started loving sartorialism while working for Ellis. “I didn’t always succeed at fashion before that,” he admits. “But I loved it! I had [M.C.] Hammer pants—that’s how bad I was.” Over the years, the designer devotee has cultivated an eclectic personal style. “I can go to work in something very preppy and the next day show up in pseudo goth.There are no rules.”<br /> <br /> Stan Mukoro<br /> <br /> Mukoro arrived on set with an entourage. A stylist— Kamal Kuku—made sure every piece was in place.But Mukoro hardly needed it. He’s been a stylist for many years. “I began loving fashion around the age of 7,” says the CEO of Mukoro Bespoke. After he attended an event Men’s Book did with Bentley Atlanta last year, the luxury car line came to Mukoro to help them with marketing and image management.“I’m also the Atlanta brand ambassador for YSL,” says Mukoro, of his relationship with Yves Saint Laurent.One of the first Nigerian male models, Mukoro began modeling at age 14, then traveled to England for schooling where he eventually began working in the fashion epicenter of men’s style, London’s Savile Row. Since then, Mukoro has honed his obsession for fashion, helping professional men find the perfect fit for personal style through Mukoro Bespoke. “People don’t know how to dress,” says Mukoro. “It’s not about the price on a tag; it’s really all about fit.” When we inquired about his unbuckled shoes? “Cockiness,” he answered.<br /> <br /> Calvin Fong<br /> <br /> Growing up in Sacramento, Calif., Fong witnessed his father’s love of custom-made suits.“That made a lasting impression on me,” says the Valentino boutique manager at Phipps Plaza.“He was part of that ’50s culture where people were still dressing up to go to the grocery store.” After high school, Fong ditched the Cali-life and made his way cross-country, stopping in Illinois, Michigan and Washington, where he ended up working for Gucci for 12 years. “Valentino found me in D.C. and moved me to Atlanta,” he says.“Valentino is still one of the few fashion houses that continues to do a couture collection and I really appreciate that. It’s an art form.” The fashionphile describes his enviable style as classic, but still modern. “I’m about high-to-low dressing,” he says, adopting the style buzz word. “I mix high-end classics with great finds from places like Stefan’s— they have the best collected vintage pieces by the way.” Even with great retro finds, Fong is rarely seen outside of a suit. “It’s part of my uniform.” <br /> <br /> Al Longman<br /> <br /> “I was dragged kicking and screaming into fashion,” says Al Longman, co-owner of Pallet Central Enterprises.“Before that, Marshall’s and TJ Maxx were my favorite shopping destinations.” Owning just three pairs of shoes back in his bachelor days, he counts his collection somewhere in the hundreds now. But Longman believes that his best fashion accessory is his wife, Su. “I’m finally at the point where she doesn’t have to dress me,” says Longman. And we believe him. Longman arrived at the shoot in a pair of amazing Armani tennis shoes and took them off in exchange for some sparkly Louis Vuitton’s.The explanation? “These are just my work shoes.”

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here