RVOC December, 2012 : Page 94

94 | | December 2012 Gutter the RADAR | PeoPle Mural, Mural… With a few ornate frescos, Bruno Serato has transformed his Anaheim White House into a Florentine villa. | By Wendy Bowman | | Photography by Melissa Valladares | Settling into a table next to one of the new fresco murals at his Anaheim White House restaurant, Bruno Serato jokingly tells a server to please refer to him as “Your Highness.” It’s a reference to Serato’s recent ranking of knighthood, bestowed on him by the Italian Republic after CNN named him among its top 10 heroes. His nonprofit Caterina’s Club has served more than 400,000 meals to needy children since 2005. “I request that my friends call me ‘Your Highness’ instead of ‘Sir.’ It sounds better—more casual,” says the charming Serato in a heavy Italian accent. And then he explains how dining at his establishment—tucked away on South Anaheim Boulevard, operating out of a historic home built in 1909—is now like taking a trip to Italy without ever leaving town. “I change the decor almost every five years. This year, I decided to go with an Italian fresco style because there’s no such thing [elsewhere] on the West Coast,” says the 56-year-old Serato, who cut his teeth in the restaurant business at age 14, while working at his parent’s eatery in Italy. He later spent several years at the now-shuttered La Vie en Rose in Brea, then took over the White House 25 years ago. Enter Newport resident and Italian artist Daniele Dolino (of Applesauce Project), who used an innovative technique called Tatoowall to digitally transfer the stunning murals—re-creations of famed works by Italian painters Andrea Appiani, Andrea Pozzo and Guido Reni, among others. And the resemblance to an original painting is astonishing. They adorn each wall of the restaurant’s first floor and were carefully chosen by Serato from hundreds of images on Dolino’s website. A few of Serato’s favorites are pictured here. “As an Italian, I always wanted my restaurant to represent Italy in the best ways possible,” Serato says. “When my American customers come here and see this, they have the illusion of dining in Italy.”

The Radar People

Wendy Bowman

Mural, Mural...

With a few ornate frescos, Bruno Serato has transformed his Anaheim White House into a Florentine villa.

Settling into a table next to one of the new fresco murals at his Anaheim White House restaurant, Bruno Serato jokingly tells a server to please refer to him as "Your Highness." It's a reference to Serato's recent ranking of knighthood, bestowed on him by the Italian Republic after CNN named him among its top 10 heroes. His nonprofit Caterina's Club has served more than 400,000 meals to needy children since 2005. "I request that my friends call me 'Your Highness' instead of 'Sir.' It sounds better—more casual," says the charming Serato in a heavy Italian accent. And then he explains how dining at his establishment—tucked away on South Anaheim Boulevard, operating out of a historic home built in 1909—is now like taking a trip to Italy without ever leaving town. "I change the decor almost every five years. This year, I decided to go with an Italian fresco style because there's no such thing [elsewhere] on the West Coast," says the 56-year-old Serato, who cut his teeth in the restaurant business at age 14, while working at his parent's eatery in Italy. He later spent several years at the now-shuttered La Vie en Rose in Brea, then took over the White House 25 years ago. Enter Newport resident and Italian artist Daniele Dolino (of Applesauce Project), who used an innovative technique called Tatoowall to digitally transfer the stunning murals—recreations of famed works by Italian painters Andrea Appiani, Andrea Pozzo and Guido Reni, among others. And the resemblance to an original painting is astonishing. They adorn each wall of the restaurant's first floor and were carefully chosen by Serato from hundreds of images on Dolino's website. A few of Serato's favorites are pictured here. "As an Italian, I always wanted my restaurant to represent Italy in the best ways possible," Serato says. "When my American customers come here and see this, they have the illusion of dining in Italy."

On the Wall...

"Il Parnaso," by Andrea Appiani

"I chose this fresco for the entrance to the White House because when people walk in, it's the first thing they see. It's about relaxing; there's no stress here."

"Sala degli Elementi," by Giorgio Vasari

"This is from Palazzo Vecchio, an old castle in Florence. I feel like I'm in Florence every time I walk by. When I look at that, I'm going back 500 years."

“Triumph of St. Ignazio,” by Andrea Pozzo

“The artist painted a full ceiling, and this is only a portion of that painting. It represents paradise.”

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/The+Radar+People/1241630/135821/article.html.

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