RVSD April 2013 : Page 88

MEN of Style By Gillian Flynn and Alison Miller Photography by Bode Helm; hair and makeup by Mosha Katani; wardrobe courtesy of Ascot Shop, Bloomingdale’s and Nordstrom; shot on location at Rancho Valencia Resort & Spa Call it a manhunt. For this year’s feature, we scouted San Diego—and even crossed the border—for a high-caliber roster of gentlemen with serious style cred. Drum roll, please... Luke Armitage When Interview magazine recently featured the hottest guys in L.A. to watch, Luke Armitage was on the short list. The only thing is, he never moved. The 24-year-old represents a new wave of S.D. creatives who are opting to stay put, making commutes to casting calls. “It’s just a great place to live,” says Armitage, who has traveled the world and lived in NYC for his on-the-verge career. When he’s not surfi ng Del Mar or hanging at home in Rancho Peñasquitos, he’s walking Milan runways for Calvin Klein and Juicy Couture. He recently shot a fragrance commercial with a high-profi le pop star. “I went from being a young surfer guy to dressing like a man... and wearing a lot of makeup,” he laughs. $1,450, by Paul Smith London at Nordstrom Fashion Valley $195, by Burberry at Nordstrom Fashion Valley $40, by Boss Black at Nordstrom Fashion Valley Suit Shirt Pocket square $125, by Trafalgar at Nordstrom Fashion Valley Belt

Men Of Style

Gillian Flynn And Alison Miller

Call it a manhunt. For this year’s feature, we scouted San Diego—and even crossed the border—for a high-caliber roster of gentlemen with serious style cred. Drum roll, please...<br /> <br /> Luke Armitage<br /> <br /> When Interview magazine recently featured the hottest guys in L.A. to watch, Luke Armitage was on the short list. The only thing is, he never moved. The 24-year-old represents a new wave of S.D. creatives who are opting to stay put, making commutes to casting calls. “It’s just a great place to live,” says Armitage, who has traveled the world and lived in NYC for his on-the-verge career. When he’s not surfi ng Del Mar or hanging at home in Rancho Peñasquitos, he’s walking Milan runways for Calvin Klein and Juicy Couture. He recently shot a fragrance commercial with a high-profi le pop star. “I went from being a young surfer guy to dressing like a man... and wearing a lot of makeup,” he laughs.<br /> <br /> Jacopo Annese <br /> <br /> “The brain is cool now,” quips neuroscientist Jacopo Annese, director of The Brain Observatory.With a penchant for Hugo Boss suits and suspenders, Annese arrived in S.D. from Italy seven years ago to join the UCSD faculty—and study the brains of dolphins in conjunction with Sea World. His own foundation, The Institute for Brain and Society, creates digital maps of the human mind. “It’s for future generations of doctors,” says Annese, who has signed up many notable San Diegans to donate their brains to science. When he’s not talking hemispheres, Annese is a passionate Italian cook, teaching classes auctioned off through local charities. His speciality? Risotto.<br /> Sign us up!<br /> <br /> Kristian Anders <br /> <br /> Gustavson Not everybody rides around La Jolla in an algae-fueled adventure motorcycle, but not everyone is Kristian Anders Gustavson. The Scripps scientist is researching alternative fuels in Baja, where he regularly tests bikes (speeds have reached 96 mph), and is also developing an app for water quality.“I’m either wearing a wetsuit or a racing suit,” says the Chicago native, who has been featured on the Discovery Channel and was named one of Outside magazine’s Chief Inspiration Offi cers. He fi rst saw the effects of water pollution when he was teaching surf lessons in front of Scripps, and he has since launched a foundation, T.J. to Tressles, to raise awareness with an annual paddle trek. Eco-conscious ladies: You can fi nd him at Cody’s in La Jolla, La Jolla Ale House, O.B. Noodle House and the Bali Hai in Point Loma, where he lives. “It’s like a pirates’ refuge.”<br /> <br /> Blair Marlin <br /> <br /> Call him the Jerry Maguire of the action sports world. From sleepy Cardiff-by-the-Sea, the pro sports agent represents a who’s who of the surfi ng and skateboarding elite, from Dane Reynolds and Dylan Reider to Bruce Irons. After retiring from competitive surfi ng himself, Marlin learned the ropes from the original action sports agent, Carlsbad’s Steve Astephen. Today, Marlin represents a new breed of professionals who travel the world— he’s just back from the X Games at A-list surf spot Foz do Iguaçu. Ever humble, Marlin works damage control (the untimely death of former client and friend Andy Irons rocked the surf world) and creates champions while wearing fl ip-fl ops, Patagonia and a boyish grin. “I’m bad with names and dates, but I’m good with colors and events,” says Marlin as he describes the aqua waves at a recent Vans Triple Crown in Hawaii. When he’s not in the water, Marlin is hitting up Zenbu Sushi or camping at San Elijo. “I’m not interested in the Hollywood scene.”<br /> <br /> Miguel Angel Guerrero <br /> <br /> Twenty years ago, when Miguel Angel Guerrero was doling out fresh, local fare from Rosarito, it wasn’t called Baja Med. “It didn’t have a name because it didn’t exist,” he says. Since then, the cuisine has been dubbed the most exciting in Mexico by the likes of Rick Bayless and continues to garner international attention. “It’s booming. Everyone is coming to try this cuisine,” he says. With his custom camoufl age chef coats, Guerrero is the ideal hunky poster boy for BajaMed. He hunts wild boar in remote Sonora and has been spearfi shing since he was 11 years old. “It’s just what I do,” he says. “I’m not on Twitter. I’m on a motorcycle crossing over Baja.” (With an entourage of 10 fi lming, of course.) This month, he opens El Colegio, his third TJ eatery after the wildly popular La Querencia and El Taller.<br /> <br /> David Patri <br /> <br /> Just look for the Indian stencil on the wall to fi nd what has turned out to be a cult-followed, elevated man cave in Luecadia. Seaweed and Gravel is a malecentric emporium of vintage apparel, hard-to-fi nd surfboards and vintage motorcycles (seaweedandgravel. Com). “It’s a cultural throwback and an appreciation of things that exist already,” says owner David Patri, who stocks everything from heritage brand clothing to books and a curated collection of vinyl in his shop, located next to the Old Post Offi ce. It’s so popular among well-traveled locals, he and his business partner are taking the “nonconforming, never-grow-up” concept to Austin, Texas, and Asbury Park, N.J., later this year. Eschewing mass-market style directives for originality, Patri is elevating West Coast fashion with his simple rule for style: “My look is a mix of fashion and easygoing.” The apparel industry vet earned chops, for designing the effortlessly cool Orange County menswear label Ambiguous and Split. Lucky for us, he decamped to Leucadia—on a sick custom 1972 Honda, of course.<br /> <br /> Adam Renfree <br /> <br /> “The Whaling Bar was one of my favorites,” reminisces Adam Renfree of the now shuttered La Jolla haunt. He’s got a thing for classics, clearly. As the business director of Libre Design, the Encinitas-based creative crew that launched sleeper hit RAEN Optics, Renfree stands out as the traditionalist. You can fi nd him at Le Chauvinist, the men’s store near his Bird Rock home. “So many classics in there,” says the newlywed, who mixes fi nds with local brands, like shoes from People’s Movement. Before settling down, Renfree traveled the world modeling and playing professional volleyball, and produced documentary fi lms in Africa with local fi lmmaker Jeffrey Brown. From its humble surf industry roots, Libre is now branding into mainstream clients such as Saint Archer Brewing Company, Daphne’s California Greek, MIZU, and Kelly Slater Wave Company. So, where does Renfree go now for his favorite whiskey? “I like El Dorado and Banker’s Hill Bar and Grill, but there is always Albie’s Beef Inn.”<br /> <br /> Spencer Caldwell<br /> <br /> Evans Anyone who has taken a tour of the new library knows Spencer C. Evans, the downtown-dwelling, architecture-loving project manager who can rattle off library stats with vigor (45,000 cubic yards of concrete, 12 million pounds of steel). “Working on a construction site is not really conducive to style,” laughs Evans, a Seattle native who fell in love with S.D. during a visit when he was 12. Having ditched his car in pursuit of purist downtown living, he walks to Bailiwick and Vin de Syrah (spoiler alert: his girlfriend sings there Friday nights), and he’s a fan of local architecture. “Guys like Rob Quigley, Jonathan Segal and Lloyd Russell are pushing the envelope, especially in this new building cycle. San Diego has so much room to grow.”

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