MIAM April 2013 : Page 114

Style MAN Let’s face it: True style goes beyond garments and luxury labels. It’s about individuality, confi dence and gutsy instincts. Our eight dapper gentlemen have these qualities in spades when it comes to their wardrobes, and in the following pages we’ve put their sartorial savvy on chic display. By Luis R. Rigual & Eugenia Santaella Photography by Nick Garcia Styling by Brandon Fogel Grooming by Marcelo Beguez & Ariel Lopez for Rik Rak Salon Shot on location at the Gale South Beach & Regent Hotel &THE The Equestrian More often than not, polo players cut a dashing fi gure both on and off the fi eld. Nic Roldan , who was competing in major tournaments by age 15, embodies the blue-blood heritage so often associated with the pony-and-mallet set, but he brings a certain down-to-earth fl air to the Sport of Kings that’s all his own—an ethos that extends to his style choices as well. Eschewing cliché polo staples, he opts for more citycentric choices like designer jeans and low V-necks when it comes to casualwear. In formal matters, he turns to Salvatore Ferragamo more often than not. “If you’re secure about yourself, then it doesn’t really matter how you dress... well, to a certain extent,” he says. “I believe men should approach their style in the most simplistic way possible because I think a guy looks his best when it seems like it took him fi ve minutes to get dressed. I never sit in front of the closet to fi gure out what shirt goes with what shoes. I go with my gut instinct.” And you know what they say: no guts, no glory. The Look Shirt by Lanvin, jacket and pants by Salvatore Ferragamo, and belt by Del Toro

Fashion & Style Style & The Man

Luis R. Rigual & Eugenia Santaella

Let’s face it: True style goes beyond garments and luxury labels. It’s about individuality, confi dence and gutsy instincts. Our eight dapper gentlemen have these qualities in spades when it comes to their wardrobes, and in the following pages we’ve put their sartorial savvy on chic display.<br /> <br /> The Equestrian <br /> <br /> More often than not, polo players cut a dashing figure both on and off the field. Nic Roldan, who was competing in major tournaments by age 15, embodies the blue-blood heritage so often associated with the pony-and-mallet set, but he brings a certain down-to-earth flair to the Sport of Kings that’s all his own—an ethos that extends to his style choices as well. Eschewing cliché polo staples, he opts for more citycentric choices like designer jeans and low V-necks when it comes to casualwear. In formal matters, he turns to Salvatore Ferragamo more often than not. “If you’re secure about yourself, then it doesn’t really matter how you dress... well, to a certain extent,” he says. “I believe men should approach their style in the most simplistic way possible because I think a guy looks his best when it seems like it took him fi ve minutes to get dressed. I never sit in front of the closet to figure out what shirt goes with what shoes. I go with my gut instinct.” And you know what they say: no guts, no glory.<br /> <br /> The Wild Card<br /> <br /> Robert Caldwell is not shy to admit he owns just two pairs of "serious pants" (in black and brown), but many, many in pastels. That revelation might seem odd coming from a businessman, but with his eclectic, rugged style and smooth attitude to match, one soon realizes Caldwell is not one to do things by the book. At work and at play, the owner of Hotel Humidor (a supplier of high-end cigars) and the Wynwood Cigar Factory (where Honduran stogies are hand-rolled) makes fashion work on his terms. "A lot of my style is influenced by where I've been," he says. "I've traveled to 54 countries and I've bought something to add to my closet at each one. If you go to Esteli on Nicaragua's border, you can get any belt in any exotic skin or a custom pair of boots made to order and ready to wear the next day." At home, Caldwell's rolling stone spirit translates to lots of tailored Levi's, bohemian custom shirts and Gucci loafers in a variety of colors. "I love bright shades," he says. "I grew up with my mother wearing Lilly Pulitzer all the time-lots of teals, oranges, reds, purples-so I kind of adopted that part of her style." Could this rebel really be a mama's boy in disguise? "No, no, no," insists Caldwell. "Just because I can rock a nice pastel doesn't mean I don't feel comfortable in a Brioni suit."<br /> <br /> The Tastemaker <br /> <br /> With his Thom Browne-cuffed slacks and tailored polos, Robert Onuska doesn’t fulfill the image normally associated with his baker profession. That’s because long before he was perfecting pastries for Stella’s Sweet Shoppe, he was sharpening his eye for style through various visual merchandising positions in Miami and New York. That’s also the secret to why his confections look as good as they taste. “It was a rather smooth professional transition for me,” says Onuska. “Whether it concerns personal style or a delicious cupcake, you can say I have an eye for presentation.” And what an eye it is. The inside knowledge Onuska gained in his former professional life taught him that style works best when its recipient resists transitory trends. For Onuska, that means classic lines that will remain relevant for years to come. “Look in my closet and you’ll find that half of my shirts are white, whether they’re Dior or Club Monaco,” he says, “but what’s common to them is the fit. If it fits great, I gravitate toward it. Pieces that will make you look sophisticated and put together are the only way to go. Of course, a little bit of color never hurts.” In fact, it’s a treat for the eyes.<br /> <br /> The Aesthete <br /> <br /> Interior designer Ernesto Mathies speaks about his work and aesthetics in general with a zest that belies his low-key outward demeanor. To wit: "When I design, I create pleasant atmospheres for clients and transform their lives into something beautiful, yet familiar. It's a priceless experience!" It's that enthusiasm (and a shrewd, spot-on eye for contemporary elegance) that keeps his Miami firm in high demand. That boisterous spirit also applies to Mathies' personal style. "Fashion is important to me because it's how I live my life," he says. "But I know better than to follow any trend." Instead, Mathies follows, or rather trusts, his instincts, and whenever in doubt (a rarity), he relies on his signature look: American classic with French twists via Lanvin and Dior Homme, which works whether he finds himself at a site in Coral Gables or consulting with a client in El Salvador. And while he has a penchant for fine labels, he doesn't like the idea of being a walking advertisement for any one brand. "That's why I like designers like Bottega Veneta, Margiela and Saint Laurent," he says. "They're streamlined, upscale and they don't scream 'Logo!' Like some others."<br /> <br /> The Craftsman <br /> <br /> Michael Saiger, the founder and creative director of Miansai, whose nautical jewelry designs are sold at retailers like Barneys Co-Op, Neiman Marcus and The Webster, found himself in his current position in a rather roundabout way. "I'm a crafty guy and I've always had an interest in antiques and collectables," he says. "I made a bracelet for myself in college and every time I'd wear it, people would ask me where I bought it." He soon realized his penchant for accessorizing could translate into a brand. Ever since his pieces made their retail debut at Base some years back, they've become in-the-know must-haves for beach bohemians and urbanites alike-a yin-yang clientele Saiger is rather familiar with. "Being from New York but living in Miami, my personal style is city meets the beach," he says. "Aside from that, I'm a pretty simple guy." Simple as in Rag & Bone, Illesteva and Band of Outsiders that is-and the occasional power suit when the situation calls for it. The water is a recurrent theme in Saiger's style sensibilities in matters of work and wardrobe, but what's paramount to him in both is individuality: "I don't make anything that looks like it's someone else's."<br /> <br /> The Classicist <br /> <br /> It's inevitable that heads will turn when LDV Hospitality principal John Meadow walks into a room. Much of it has to do with the man's movie star swagger and his impeccably cut suits. A former New Yorker, Meadow first set his sights on Miami when he opened Scarpetta at the Fontainebleau some years back. After the success of that venture, he decided to expand LDV's portfolio with the recent openings of Dolce, The Regent Cocktail Club and Rec Room, all at the Gale in South Beach. Much like his dapper restaurants and bars, Meadow's style exudes that air of nonchalance Italians refer to as sprezzatura and he can't help but remind us of the type of "Cinema Italiano" men Kate Hudson's character sings about in the film musical Nine. "I've identified my personal style," says Meadow. "That's the key: to find what's truly you and embrace it." For Meadow, that means annual visits to Sartoria Romagnoli, his tailor in Florence, who supplies him with the slim-fit suits that have become his trademark. Stateside, he looks to brands like Brunello Cucinelli, RRL and Bontoni to supplement his bespoke wardrobe. His no-foul secret is to remain consistent. "Trends come and go, so if lapels become narrow or wide, it doesn't matter to me because I know I'll be dressing the same way for the rest of my life," says Meadow. "It's as simple as that."<br /> <br /> The Entertainer<br /> <br /> In the 10 years that Louis Aguirre has been on the air as the gregarious co-host of the irreverent Deco Drive, Miami viewers have seen his style evolve right before their eyes. "I don't tinker around with jeans and T-shirts anymore," he says. "These days, I'm digging the suits, the jackets and the pops of color that I never really wore before." It wasn't always like that. At the start of his career, Aguirre found monochromatic comfort in his uniform of shirts and ties. Eventually, he loosened up-especially after stints in New York and L.A., which opened his eyes to myriad style possibilities. "I definitely don't have the 'fashion gene,'" he says-though many would beg to differ-"but I'm constantly learning from the people around me." Aguirre is not shy to admit he uses local stylist Elysze Held for his on-air wardrobe (and on more than one occasion for his personal life). As for his go-to designer? "Tom Ford, without a doubt," he says. "I can wear his stuff right off the rack and that doesn't happen often." Above all, Aguirre believes style boils down to a person's state of mind. "Depending on how I'm feeling, I will wear a certain outfit or go for a certain look," he says. "If you think about it, fashion is a reflection of how you feel inside."<br /> <br /> The Professional <br /> <br /> The role of Univision's consumer marketing director is a position that demands long days and late nights, all to ensure viewers are not just entertained by what they're watching at home, but also kept abreast of the network's latest initiatives. Miami native David Quijano makes it all look too easy—and it doesn't hurt that he looks good while doing it. Whether he's in a formal, razor-sharp Dolce & Gabbana suit at an awards show or in a Ralph Lauren shirt and Scotch & Soda chinos on a casual day off, Quijano follows the tenets of effortless style with GQ precision. His main goal in wardrobe matters is to put together garments to achieve that elusive signature flair personal stylists are so good at. "We're all inspired by someone we know or a designer we love, but you have to incorporate your own personality into what you wear," he says. "There's no reason to dress head to toe in just one brand. It's all about integrating and wearing the clothes. Not the other way around." His one piece of advice for the sartorially overwhelmed? "Invest in key pieces that add to your wardrobe," he says. "I recently purchased a new pair of Saint Laurent pony-hair high-tops in a leopard print and I'm obsessed."<br /> <br />

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