HBCH April 2013 : Page 90

IN-HOU S E H OS PITALIT Y Past Perfect This hip new neighborhood hangout was handcrafted with “cozy” in mind. By Rhys Hunding Photography by Anthony Tahlier STAFF ONLY From left: Greg O’Neill, Matt Nardella, Ken Miller and Ted Harris take a much-deserved break at the new Bar Pastoral on Broadway in Lakeview. A guy walks into a wine bar, a delicatessen, a sidewalk café and a 30-seat bistro. Th e punch line? Bar Pastoral. What could be an entire block in the trendy Lakeview East neighborhood is all under the same storefront at the new oenophilist eatery— thanks to architect Matt Nardella of Moss Design (moss-design.com). Pastoral has been in the business of selling fi ne wines, artisan cheeses, meats and breads since 2004, so the next logical step was a restaurant concept. When the space next door to their fl agship shop on Broadway opened up, owners Greg O’Neill and Ken Miller asked Nardella to step in. Th e skipper of Moss studio was educated in California, which shows up in his design sensibility. “Th e principles are the same (on the West Coast)—how to blur the barriers between the outdoors and indoor living space—but the aesthetic and lifestyle is diff erent,” Nardella explains. With Bar Pastoral, his sensitivity to fl exible space comes across in the form of a fully operable facade that, in warmer months, can fold away for an en plein air experience. And the “feel” of the interiors is based on the business beneath its roof— drawing from the past while appealing to present-day patronage. “We took pieces of design from France and Italy, and brought details back in a modern way to the space,” says Nardella. Despite the global appeal of the space, the original details benefi ted from the work of various Chicago artisans. For example, the European-inspired barrel-vault plaster ceiling and the tables inlaid with excess wine crates were both creations of local craftsmen. But possibly the most noticeable examples of hometown handiwork are the light fi xtures from local designer Ted Harris, who had the bright idea to upcycle salvaged materials to create an authentically rustic ambience. Butter churns, industrial stock pot lids and milking machines that came from restaurant supply stores, personal collections and fl ea-market excursions were all wired and put to work. While it is not always easy dealing with older urban buildings, it was a point of motivation in this case. “Th at’s the fun of it, making opportunities out of unexpected obstacles you come across,” Nardella admits. Complications aside, this client/designer/artisan team managed to come up with an inspired and intimate space that is sure to delight the Broadway-bound for years to come. 90 | | Spring 2013

In-House Hospitality

Rhys Hunding

Past Perfect

This hip new neighborhood hangout was handcrafted with “cozy” in mind.

A guy walks into a wine bar, a delicatessen, a sidewalk café and a 30-seat bistro. The punch line? Bar Pastoral. What could be an entire block in the trendy Lakeview East neighborhood is all under the same storefront at the new oenophilist eatery— thanks to architect Matt Nardella of Moss Design (moss-design.com). Pastoral has been in the business of selling fine wines, artisan cheeses, meats and breads since 2004, so the next logical step was a restaurant concept. When the space next door to their flagship shop on Broadway opened up, owners Greg O’Neill and Ken Miller asked Nardella to step in.

The skipper of Moss studio was educated in California, which shows up in his design sensibility. “The principles are the same (on the West Coast)—how to blur the barriers between the outdoors and indoor living space—but the aesthetic and lifestyle is different,” Nardella explains. With Bar Pastoral, his sensitivity to flexible space comes across in the form of a fully operable facade that, in warmer months, can fold away for an en plein air experience. And the “feel” of the interiors is based on the business beneath its roof— drawing from the past while appealing to present-day patronage. “We took pieces of design from France and Italy, and brought details back in a modern way to the space,” says Nardella.

Despite the global appeal of the space, the original details benefited from the work of various Chicago artisans. For example, the European-inspired barrel-vault plaster ceiling and the tables inlaid with excess wine crates were both creations of local craftsmen. But possibly the most noticeable examples of hometown handiwork are the light fixtures from local designer Ted Harris, who had the bright idea to upcycle salvaged materials to create an authentically rustic ambience. Butter churns, industrial stock pot lids and milking machines that came from restaurant supply stores, personal collections and flea-market excursions were all wired and put to work.

While it is not always easy dealing with older urban buildings, it was a point of motivation in this case. “That’s the fun of it, making opportunities out of unexpected obstacles you come across,” Nardella admits. Complications aside, this client/designer/artisan team managed to come up with an inspired and intimate space that is sure to delight the Broadwaybound for years to come.

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/In-House+Hospitality+/1372773/154600/article.html.

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