MANH March 2014 : Page 86

[ART & CULTURE] BO OK NEWS BE-SPOKE STYLE Biking is o cially in: Citi Bike is expected to hit 100,000 annual memberships this month, and even o -season winter cycling was up 86 percent from 2008 to 2012, with a daily average of nearly 10,700 braving the elements on two wheels. In New York Bike Style ($30, Prestel), out March 25, Brooklyn-based photographer Sam Polcer (who runs the biking blog preferredmode.com) scoured the city for the sharpest cyclists, capturing their unique looks in rich, full-page photographs. at’s something we can get geared up for. –Zachary Wilson And You’ll Be Reading… Lexi Beach , co-owner of the only independent bookstore in Queens, Astoria Bookshop (31-29 31st St., astoriabookshop.com), gives us this month’s most anticipated new books. young woman was killed outside her apartment building and the phrase ‘the bystander effect’ entered the national vocabulary.” My Usual Table: A Life in Restaurants by Colman Andrews ($26, Ecco) “A vivid memoir of a life in food, from the James Beard Award-winning writer and co-founding editor of Saveur .” RIDE ALONG (From left) NYC cyclist Xiao, shot at Stanton and Suffolk streets, on her way home from shopping in Soho; the bookʼs cover. American Flyer Continuing our bike theme, in the summer of 2011, at age 57, longtime New York Times writer Bruce Weber set out on a cross-country cycling trip from the coast of Oregon to NYC—alone. Weber documented every pump of his pedals in his popular nytimes.com series, detailing the sights he saw and people he met. Now he’s expanded those writings into Life Is a Wheel ($26, Scribner), a witty tale that’s equal parts memoir, travelogue and a story of self-determination, at any age. Below, an excerpt from the work, out March 18. – ZW The Blazing World by Siri Hustvedt ($26, Simon & Schuster) “From the author of The Blindfold and The Enchantment of Lily Dahl , a brilliant, provocative new novel about an artist who, after years of being ignored by the art world, conducts an experiment: She conceals her female identity behind three male fronts.” The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature by Ben Tarnoff ($28, Penguin Press) “The unforgettable story of the birth of modern America and the Western writers who gave voice to its emerging identity.” Kitty Genovese: The Murder, the Bystanders, the Crime That Changed America by Kevin Cook ($26, W.W. Norton) “A riveting, suspenseful account of what really happened that night 50 years ago in Kew Gardens, Queens, when a “I’m not a novelist and this isn’t a novel (though I’d argue that because I’m generating the plot as I go along, not as the writer but as the main character, it amounts to something pretty similar). In any case the parallels between riding and writing are actually substantial; it seems so, at least, for someone engaged in both of them. Like a writer beginning a book, a cyclist has a long way to go before he can envision the end. Both push o in a speci ed direction with hope and uncertainty. Both make wrong turns, both are prone to whimsy, serendipity and sudden inspiration. Both come up with ideas they didn’t know they had and encounter surprising characters who change the course of things. Trying to e ect and negotiate a compelling path from beginning to end, both confront potential disaster, succumb to misleading optimism, experience hubris and self-doubt, anguish and delight. Indeed, sitting down to begin a piece of writing and climbing aboard a bicycle to begin a long journey are both daunting prospects, equally likely to induce procrastination. I know something about that, too. It’s been three days since I ew here to Portland and I haven’t gotten anywhere yet. Time to saddle up.” Excerpted from Life Is a Wheel © 2014 by Bruce Weber; used with the permission of the publisher, Scribner, a division of Simon & Schuster. 86 M ANH ATTAN M ARCH 2014 Every Day Is for the Thief by Teju Cole ($23, Random House) “From the author of Open City, this amalgam of fi ction, memoir, art and travel writing was originally published in Nigeria in 2007 and is now available outside Africa for the fi rst time.” How About Never—Is Never Good for You? My Life in Cartoons by Bob Mankoff ($32.50, Henry Holt) “A memoir from the cartoon editor of The New Yorker , a story about making a career out of your passion.”

Art & Culture Books

BE-SPOKE STYLE

Biking is officially in: Citi Bike is expected to hit 100,000 annual memberships this month, and even o -season winter cycling was up 86 percent from 2008 to 2012, with a daily average of nearly 10,700 braving the elements on two wheels. In New York Bike Style ($30, Prestel), out March 25, Brooklynbased photographer Sam Polcer (who runs the biking blog preferredmode.com) scoured the city for the sharpest cyclists, capturing their unique looks in rich, full-page photographs. That's something we can get geared up for. -Zachary Wilson

American Flyer

Continuing our bike theme, in the summer of 2011, at age 57, longtime New York Times writer Bruce Weber set out on a cross-country cycling trip from the coast of Oregon to NYC-alone. Weber documented every pump of his pedals in his popular nytimes.com series, detailing the sights he saw and people he met. Now he's expanded those writings into Life Is a Wheel ($26, Scribner), a witty tale that's equal parts memoir, travelogue and a story of self-determination, at any age. Below, an excerpt from the work, out March 18. -ZW

"I'm not a novelist and this isn't a novel (though I'd argue that because I'm generating the plot as I go along, not as the writer but as the main character, it amounts to something pretty similar). In any case the parallels between riding and writing are actually substantial; it seems so, at least, for someone engaged in both of them.

Like a writer beginning a book, a cyclist has a long way to go before he can envision the end. Both push o in a speci ed direction with hope and uncertainty. Both make wrong turns, both are prone to whimsy, serendipity and sudden inspiration. Both come up with ideas they didn't know they had and encounter surprising characters who change the course of things. Trying to e ect and negotiate a compelling path from beginning to end, both confront potential disaster, succumb to misleading optimism, experience hubris and self-doubt, anguish and delight.

Indeed, sitting down to begin a piece of writing and climbing aboard a bicycle to begin a long journey are both daunting prospects, equally likely to induce procrastination.

I know something about that, too. It's been three days since I ew here to Portland and I haven't gotten anywhere yet. Time to saddle up."

Excerpted from Life Is a Wheel © 2014 by Bruce Weber; used with the permission of the publisher, Scribner, a division of Simon & Schuster

And You'll Be Reading…

Lexi Beach, co-owner of the only independent bookstore in Queens, Astoria Bookshop (31-29 31st St., astoriabookshop.com), gives us this month's most anticipated new books.

The Blazing World by Siri Hustvedt ($26, Simon & Schuster) "From the author of The Blindfold and The Enchantment of Lily Dahl, a brilliant, provocative new novel about an artist who, after years of being ignored by the art world, conducts an experiment: She conceals her female identity behind three male fronts."

The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature by Ben Tarnoff ($28, Penguin Press) "The unforgettable story of the birth of modern America and the Western writers who gave voice to its emerging identity."

Kitty Genovese: The Murder, the Bystanders, the Crime That Changed America by Kevin Cook ($26, W.W. Norton) "A riveting, suspenseful account of what really happened that night 50 years ago in Kew Gardens, Queens, when a young woman was killed outside her apartment building and the phrase 'the bystander effect' entered the national vocabulary."

My Usual Table: A Life in Restaurants by Colman Andrews ($26, Ecco) "A vivid memoir of a life in food, from the James Beard Awardwinning writer and co-founding editor of Saveur."

Every Day Is for the Thief by Teju Cole ($23, Random House) "From the author of Open City, this amalgam of fiction, memoir, art and travel writing was originally published in Nigeria in 2007 and is now available outside Africa for the first time."

How About Never-Is Never Good for You? My Life in Cartoons by Bob Mankoff ($32.50, Henry Holt) "A memoir from the cartoon editor of The New Yorker, a story about making a career out of your passion."

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Art+%26+Culture+Books/1651530/199570/article.html.

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