MANH April 2014 : Page 122

The GUIDe Enjoy NYC’s best restaurants, sorted alphabetically and by neighborhood. Prices reflect average cost of a three-course dinner for one, excluding drinks, tax and tip. Note: Menus change frequently and seasonally, so not all items mentioned may be available at all times. $$$$ $$$ $$ $ [feast] Very expensive ( $ 60 and up) expensive ( $ 40-$ 60) Moderate ( $ 30-$ 40) Inexpensive (under $ 30) Michelin stars The New York Times 3-4 stars NeW ReSTAURANTS By Beth Landman Daruma-ya Gone is the cult favorite Italian/ Japanese-hybrid, Greenwich Grill, and in its place is this traditional soba and izakaya restaurant, where master chef Shuichi Kotani prepares eight different soba variations, including uni, bottarga and duck. Small plates such as tempura-marinated octopus are also served, alongside Japanese whiskeys and craft cocktails. 428 Greenwich Ave./Laight St., 212.274.0428 $$ General Assembly The owners of Quality Meats and Quality Italian are going for a culinary trifecta with this American bistro. Creative offerings like celery root and apple salad with almond butter and date molasses will join a steak-focused menu, featuring sides like maitake mushrooms with tomato butter. 360 Park Ave./26th St., 212.951.7111 $$$ Tender Dale Schnell, whose pedigree includes the executive chef post at Setai and Picholine, has taken the reins at this new modern American spot, which has a menu that runs the gamut from KICKER THE CUTTING EDGE From top: One of Bobby Van’s steakhouse’s signature dishes, the filet mignon; owner Rick Passarelli (right) with Alec Baldwin. high Steaks All-American steakhouse Bobby Van’s (bobbyvans.com) is known for fine meats and solid service throughout their five Manhattan locations and their Bridgehampton outpost. Here, owner Rick Passarelli explains what keeps NYC steak lovers coming back. –Camille Hunt The original Bobby Van’s opened in Bridgehampton in 1969. How has the restaurant concept changed? service, with a lot of history and happy memories. How has the dining landscape changed since the first Bobby Van’s steakhouse launched in NYC more than two decades ago? Describe your ideal meal at Bobby Van’s. That restaurant was more of a piano bar and had a pub-like feeling. Today we’re known for being a top-notch steakhouse. Since opening, it’s evolved to become more of a serious restaurant. You’re known for attracting a loyal local clientele. What keeps people coming back? Great food and great The city has seen a lot more restaurants and steakhouses open. In order to stay above the competition, we remain focused on making sure everything is of the highest possible quality— and utmost class. 122 I would start with a seafood bouquet appetizer, follow with a porterhouse steak—cooked medium rare—with creamed spinach and hash browns, and end the meal with a chocolate mousse cake with mixed berries. And to drink, I would order a California cabernet. What do you say to someone who likes his or her steak well done, or with a side I would tell them to have it any way they want! A well-done steak tends to get dry and tough, but the people who order it that way have probably been eating it well done their whole lives. What’s next for the company? of A-1 sauce? We’ll continue to open new places, some in NYC and some out of state. We plan to expand to Miami, Chicago and Las Vegas. M ANH ATTAN APRIL 2014

Feast Guide

Beth Landman

Enjoy NYC's best restaurants, sorted alphabetically and by neighborhood. Prices reflect average cost of a three-course dinner for one, excluding drinks, tax and tip. Note: Menus change frequently and seasonally, so not all items mentioned may be available at all times.

NEW RESTAURANTS

Daruma-ya Gone is the cult favorite Italian/ Japanese-hybrid, Greenwich Grill, and in its place is this traditional soba and izakaya restaurant, where master chef Shuichi Kotani prepares eight different soba variations, including uni, bottarga and duck. Small plates such as tempuramarinated octopus are also served, alongside Japanese whiskeys and craft cocktails. 428 Green wich A ve. /Laight St., 212.274.0428 $$

General Assembly The owners of Quality Meats and Quality Italian are going for a culinary trifecta with this American bistro. Creative offerings like celery root and apple salad with almond butter and date molasses will join a steakfocused menu, featuring sides like maitake mushrooms with tomato butter. 360 Park Ave./26th St., 212.951.7111 $$$

Tender Dale Schnell, whose pedigree includes the executive chef post at Setai and Picholine, has taken the reins at this new modern American spot, which has a menu that runs the gamut from filet mignon with chimichurri sauce to Asian fusion dishes. Sushi of Gari vet Edwin Purnomo is overseeing the sushi bar. 132 West 47th St./ Seventh Ave., 212.514.6000 $$$

Heartwood Former Daniel Boulud chefs Mark Fiorentino and Brad Thompson have teamed with former Gramercy Tavern managing partner Nick Mautone to take over the old Donatella space in Chelsea. The woodburning oven will be a focus of the menu, which will feature roast meats and vegetables as well as wood-fired pizza. 184 Eighth Ave./19th St., no phone yet $$

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

North End Grill Inside this Danny Meyer-owned Battery Park space, which overlooks the Hudson River, Top Chef Masters champ and former Tabla partner Floyd Cardoz brings a sophisticated, seafood-heavy menu that befits the classic interior. As some patrons flit between tables, others can barely tear themselves away from the butterscotch pots de creme and grilled monkfish with navy beans with watermelon. 104 North End Ave./Murray St., 646.747.1600 $$$

TRIBECA

Atera The intimate 17-seat Atera is a showcase for Executive Chef Matthew Lightner's everchanging prix fixe tasting menu, with small snacks like foie gras "peanuts" and main acts like ragout of fish cheeks with seaweed butter and heirloom garlic. Its two Michelin stars and a coveted three-star New York Times review make it well worth the uberlong wait for a reservation. 77 Worth St./Broadway, 212.226.1444 $$$

Dylan Prime Take away the steak and many steakhouses immediately fall flat. But not Dylan Prime. The ritzy Tribeca eatery does solid nouveau American fare in elegant, minimalist quarters. But its trump card is its grown-up cocktail menu (and hours): Martinis garnished with baconstuffed olives appeal to the savory tooth, and the lounge is open late for young—and youngat- heart—revelers. 62 Laight St./ Varick St., 212.334.4783 $$$

Khe-Yo Executive chef Soulayphet Schwader, partner Nick Bradley and restaurateur Marc Forgione thought that New York should get to know Laotian cuisine, so they opened Khe-Yo, which serves up items like Ping-Sai-Ua-Moo—grilled Laos-style sausage with starfruit and sweet peanut sauce—and Ping-Sien-Moo—Berkshire spare ribs with smashed long bean and cherry tomato. You can even eat the sticky rice with your hands. 157 Duane St./Hudson St. and W. Broadway, 212.587.1089 $$

Kutsher's Tribeca This Tribeca eatery rejiggers the century-old menu from the Kutsher's Country Club in Monticello, N.Y. Restaurateur Jeffrey Chodorow and scion Zach Kutsher have teamed up to upgrade Jewish- American comfort-food standards in dishes like crispy potato latkes with creme fraiche and caviar on a deconstructed borscht salad. There's even a Shabbat special, Friday night roast chicken with pletzel and black trumpet mushroom stuffing. 186Franklin St./ Greenwich St., 212.431.0606 $$

landmarc As popular with bankers as it is with legal eagles, Landmarc offers a long list of reasonably priced wines, salads and pastas available in two sizes; $4 desserts; and a menu filled with serious crowd-pleasing entrees such as roasted bone marrow with onion marmalade, scallops and an excellent burger. Chef Marc Murphy also operates a Landmarc outpost in the Time Warner Center. 179 W. Broadway/ Leonard St., 212.343.3883 $$

Locanda Verde C h e f Andrew Carmellini has achieved grand success with Locanda Verde, where he serves rustic pastas, wood-fired meats, delectable cheeses and affordable wines. What fuels word of mouth about this place is its vibe—it's a casual yet upscale room where chic Tribeca diners enjoy well-cooked, smartly presented food. It's also an excellent spot for a fundraiser, as Barack and Michelle Obama can attest. 377 Greenwich St./N. Moore St., 212. 925.3797 $$

Marc Forgione A winner of the Food Network's Next Iron Chef, Marc Forgione's hefty respect for sustainable ingredients and mastery of seafood plays out in the form of a kampachi tartare appetizer with avocado, Szechuan buttons, toasted pine nuts and Saratoga chips. Belly up to brunch here too: Sundays highlights the housemade French toast brioche. 134 Reade St./Hudson St., 212.941.9401 $$$

Terroir Tribeca Following the success of Hearth and the original Terroir in the East Village, former Craft toque Marco Canora and Hearth General Manager Paul Grieco brought the popular wine-bar concept to Tribeca. Expect unknown vintners and thrilling vintages, presented with friendly explanations. Bar bites (risotto balls, cheese and charcuterie) are designed to complement what you're drinking. Check out Meatball Sunday, which features a prix fixe menu for two. 24 Harrison St./Greenwich St., 212.625.9463 $

Thalassa The Greek gods have smiled upon Thalassa, which has been serving fresh, reliable Hellenic fare in Tribeca for more than eight years. Its range of seafood, coupled with its expansive Greek wine list and well-curated Mediterranean cheese selection, make this a place worth visiting. Just ask Meryl Streep, Scarlett Johansson or any of the other stars who've dined here. 179 Franklin St./Greenwich St., 212.941.7661 $$$

EAST VILLAGE/ LOWER EAST SIDE

Beauty & Essex For those who've had their fill of cashonly restaurants, this Lower East Side spot that takes all forms of payment; this dining and nightlife space even features a functioning pawn shop in the front. In the 300-person dining room, expect new riffs on the small plates chef Chris Santos (Stanton Social) is known for, including tuna poke wonton tacos. 146Essex St. /Stanton St., 212. 614.0146 $$$

Edi & the Wolf The team behind the Michelin-starred Seasonal ventures into Alphabet City with this casual Austrian wine bar modeled after Vienna's wine taverns. The list of bottles and glasses is impressive and accessible. The menu—a combination of small plates, such as grilled squid salad, and shared plates, including spaetzle with wild mushrooms and Brussels sprouts—does its owners proud. 102 Ave. C/ 7th St., 212.598.1040 $$

Empellon Cocina For Alex Stupak's latest menu he casts masa—the cornmeal dough used in tacos and tortillas—in the leading role. No longer a supporting ingredient, masa takes the form of crisps for guacamole, and fettuccine with maitake mushrooms and boiled pine nuts. The spot has quickly attracted a celebrity following, with pop-ins by Bradley Cooper, Zoe Saldana and Ashton Kutcher. 105 First Ave./ 6th St., 212.780.0999 $$$

Fonda Chef Roberto Santibane's successes include creating several eateries in his hometown, being named best chef in Austin, Texas; and putting out a cookbook. Expanding on his Park Slope restaurant Fonda, he brings urbane Mexican fare, like shrimp and scallop enchiladas, to its sister restaurant in the East Village. If you're after Latin libations, don't miss Sangria Tuesday or Mojito Wednesday. 40Ave. B/ 3rd St., 212.677.4096 $

Frank Fifteen years young, Frank still offers plenty of great reasons to wait for a teeny-tiny table, including a startlingly long, impressive wine list, roasted garlic bread with imported salted anchovies; and handmade gnocchi with tomatoes, basil and parmigiana. Owner Frank Prisinzano says he deliberately positioned the eatery to fill the gap between "ego-driven pricey restaurants and cheap fast-food dumps." 88 SecondAve./6th St., 212. 420.0106 $$

Il Buco Alimentar i & Vineria Watch chef Justin Smillie's open kitchen in action, and order up hearty plates like crispy artichokes, house-cured salumi and rotisserieprepared meats—including the beloved porchetta, of course. It didn't take long for word to get out about this Noho gem, which one night in 2012 had both Rachael Ray and Martha Stewart in the house. 53 Great Jones St./ Bowery, 212.837.2622 $$

Momofuku Ko Scoring a reservation at this 12- seat David Chang eatery may be tough, but this Michelin two-star temple will have you sampling creations such as eighthour short ribs, braised daikon, pickled carrot and mustard seeds; as well as shaved foie gras, lychee and pine nut brittle. Don't fret, the extravagant lunch service makes more of those coveted bar stools available. 163 First Ave./10th St., 212. 228.7293 $$$$

Motorino Motorino faced the challenge of filling the shoes, and ovens, of Una Pizza Napoletana, whose space it replaced in the East Village. The verdict is in, and it's favorable. The coaloven pies, topped with everything from fior di latte and smoked pancetta to soppressata and garlic, never disappoint—though the long lines may. In our opinion, definitely worth the wait. 349 E. 12th St./ First Ave., 212.777.2644 $$

Prune Gabrielle Hamilton's deceptively homey cafe exudes a charm that's hardly necessary considering the mind-altering, ingredientworshipping wonders she produces from the tiny kitchen. Go for brunch, when the bold offerings—fried-oyster omelets and umpteen varieties of Bloody Marys—will redefine the genre as you know it. Just be prepared to wait with the customers lining up at the door. 54 E. 1st St./ First Ave., 212.677.6221 $$

Saxon + Parole

Michelin-touted chef Brad Farmerie's reimagined space takes its name from two prizewinning New York thoroughbreds that garnered national acclaim. All bets are on the American menu, which is fittingly complemented by a bourbon-heavy cocktail program featuring the house-label Parole whiskey. In a novel twist, barman Naren Young creates a Manhattan with whiskey and vermouth dispensed from a tap. 316 Bowery/Bleecker St., 212. 254.0350 $$$

SOHO/NOLITA

Acme The owners of Indochine reincarnated this Noho institution with Danish chef Mads Refslund at the helm. A co-founder of Copenhagen's Noma, Refslund retired the old Acme's Cajun staples for new Nordic cuisine. Princess Beatrice, Jonah Hill and MIA have all popped in for dishes like black bass with raw chestnuts and buttermilk horseradish, or chicken and eggs with roasted potatoes. 9 Great Jones St./Lafayette St., 212.203.2121 $$$

Balthazar The iconic jewel of Keith McNally's empire remains one of the most stylish spots to relax with a cappuccino and a pain au chocolat. The French bistro's offerings—like duck confit—are surprisingly refined, but any desire for quiet or personal space is best checked at the door. Prepare for star sightings—you might see Victoria Beckham or Katie Holmes. 80 Spring St./ Crosby St., 212.343.1274 $$

Francois Payard Bakery For anyone who's been craving Francois Payard's macarons, seasonal fruit tarts and signature roule cakes, there's a steady supply here. Tory Burch showed up for the opening party, along with fans of Payard's classic croquemonsieur made with French country ham, Gruyere and bechamel. Look for salads too, all for takeaway or to eat in the 20-seat dining room. 116 W. Houston St./Sullivan St., 212.995.0888 $

Ken & Cook Mercer Kitchen alum chef Richard Diamonte and GM Artan Gjoni took over the former Travertine space on Kenmare and are serving up refined, modern American classics like oysters Rockefeller, steak tartare and linguini with clams. The new venture aims to be an unpretentious neighborhood joint, despite its ultratrendy address. 19 Kenmare St/Elizabeth St., 212. 966.3058 $$$

La Esquina What's the secreto of La Esquina? Could it be the walkin taqueria, with its somewhat limited menu, or the clandestine brasserie? Either way, what you'll encounter in the low-light subterranean space is a warmly lit lounge with a fun, insidery vibe. La Esquina's hosted everyone from Miley Cyrus and Gisele Bundchen to Woody Harrelson and Anne Hathaway. 114 Kenmare St./Centre St., 646.613.1333 $$

Lafayette Housed in a Noho landmark building with interiors by Roman & Williams, this handsome restaurant is an ideal setting for chef Andrew Carmellini, who put together a menu spanning different regions of French brasserie fare, like the oxtail and foie gras terrine with red cabbage and lady apple or the standout duck au poivre with organic grains, radish and smoked bacon. 380 Lafayette Ave./ Great Jones and Broadway, 212. 533.3000 $$$

Pulqueria The latest venture from Chris and Heather Tierney, the brother-sister duo behind Apotheke, grew out of a food-filled and pulque-soaked adventure in Mexico. Pulque is an intoxicating local elixir made from fermented agave, and the siblings now serve it in New York. Chef Steven Menter designed the menu around his hometown's street foods; check the double-headed jaguarserpent indicating maguey (drink) and tlacualli (food). 11 Doyers St./ Bowery, 212.227.3099 $$

WEST VILLAGE/ GREENWICH VILLAGE

Babbo Celebrity chef Mario Batali continues to enjoy gastronomic and business success with Babbo, the undisputed spicy meatball in his coast-to-coast Italiano empire. The boisterousyet- sophisticated ambience and elevated Italian classics keep this international dining destination white hot. Plus, it's now serving lunch: Go, and convince your tablemates to spring for the delectable pasta-tasting menu. 110 Waverly Pl./MacDougal St., 212.777.0303 $$$

Blue Hill Blue Hill chef Dan Barber has helped revolutionize the trend toward socially conscious high-end cuisine. The Greenwich Village flagship is supported by the Stone Barns partner farm upstate, from which almost all the restaurant's produce, poultry and pork comes. Let the kitchen take you through the tasting menu and show you the pleasures of a simple nugget of cauliflower. 75 Washington Pl./Sixth Ave., 212.539.1776 $$$

Blue Ribbon Bakery Although the breads here are indeed terrific, this is far more than a bakery. Good luck finding better finger food (if foie gras terrine, beef marrow and a soulful duck breast can really be considered such) come 11:30 on a Saturday night. The service may be rushed, and conversation can be hard over the clattering din, but patrons never leave disappointed. 35 Downing St./Bedford St., 212.337.0404 $$

Carbone Mario Carbone, Rich Torrisi and Jeff Zalaznick created Carbone in celebration of the Italian-American eateries of the mid-20th century New York, conceiving of a simple menu of unpretentious yet refined Italian-American comfort food. For lunchtime, try Mario's meatballs, and for dinner go for the oxtail cavitelli followed by the mixed grill cacciatore or veal parmesan. 181 Thompson St./ Bleecker and W. Houston streets, 212.254.3000 $$$$

Commerce This ambitious eatery showcases chef Harold Moore's French treatment of American fare. The bread basket includes pretzels, and the roasted chicken or porterhouse for two is increasingly popular with couples on a second or third date. The convivial if chaotic dining room, outfitted to recall the space's days as a speakeasy, is as stylish as the cuisine. 50 Commerce St./Bedford St., 212.524.2301 $$$

Decoy Head downstairs from RedFarm, where its proprietors have opened Decoy, a mini restaurant which features the Triple Luck, a round of three specialty sochu cocktails, which can be paired with bar snacks like the Double Duck, a grilled duck wrap served with a roast duck wrap, shrimp-stuffed jalapeno poppers or the lobster claw tempura. 529-1/2 Hudson St./Charles St., 212.792.9700 $$

Dell'Anima In 2007, this little Italian effort prompted "Oh, you have to try" recommendations among downtown diners. The antipasti, like duck tartare and Maine sweet shrimp crudo, signaled that chef Gabe Thompson knew how to maximize flavor, and his spaghetti with peekytoe crab and sea urchin competed for best pasta in the city. 38 Eighth Ave./Jane St., 212.366.6633 $$

Fedora Fedora imported a hotshot chef from Montreal (Au Pied de Cochon's Mehdi Brunet- Benkritly), who brings a love of all things meat to the menu. From opening salvos like crispy pigs head to mains like a pork chop or apple glazed duck leg, there's no way you're leaving with anything resembling an appetite. 239 W. 4th St./10th St., 646. 449.9336 $$$

Il Mulino The service may be gruff at this hushed, hallowed temple of traditional Italian cuisine, but the food is otherworldly. Start with the Burrata Mozzerella and tomato salad with roasted peppers; then go for the poached octopus, seafood risotto or its many other delicacies. 86 W. 3rd St./Thompson St., 212.673.3783 $$$$

L'Artusi L'Artusi is the spot where former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn chose to celebrate his release from house arrest last year. We can only imagine that his menu options—orecchiette with sausage, salumi and pecorino; and outrageous sweetbreads and hanger steak with crispy potatoes and salsa bianco—were far nicer than they would have been had he ended up in prison. 228 W. 10th St./Bleecker St., 212.255.5757 $$

Louro Chef David Santos created a host of creative modern American plates at this relaxed yet sophisticated West Village spot. Every Monday is the Nossa Mesa Supper Club, a prix fixe menu with different themes like Mid- Winter Tropical Rum-ble and Nonna's Italian feast, where guests can BYO wine and beer. Otherwise, dine on entrees like the kimchee prawn hot pot. 142 W. 10th St./Waverly PL, 212.206.0606$$$

The Marrow Chef Harold Dieterle, who had two hits with his partner, Alicia Nosenz, in Kin Shop and Perilla, looked to his mother's Italian and father's German heritage for inspiration when he opened the Marrow. The marriage of the two cuisines produced innovative dishes like the namesake bone marrow, served with sea urchin, fried potatoes, Meyer lemon aioli and baby celery greens. 99 Bank St./ Greenwich and Hudson streets, 212.428.6000 $$$

Miss Lily's Calling itself a Caribbean oasis in the middle of downtown Manhattan, Miss Lily's is the product of the collaboration the winning team of Paul Salmon (Joe's Pub), brothers Binn and Genc Jakupi (Bungalow 8) , and Serge Becker (La Esquina). Miss Lily's also has a menu that's fresh and delicious, from the jaquitos (Jamaican mini tacos) to the jerk chicken burgers. 132 W. Houston St./Sullivan St., 646.588.5375 $$

The Little Owl The quintessential neighborhood nook if there ever was one, what The Little Owl lacks in reservation availability and elbow room, it more than makes up for in charm—especially if you can score the window seat overlooking Bedford Street. 90 Bedford St./ Grove St., 212.741.4695 $$

Minetta Tavern Keith McNally packs in the cool kids and carnivores jonesing for roasted bone marrow, oxtail-and-foie gras terrine and the now-famous $28 Black Label burger, made with butcher-to-the-stars Pat LaFrieda's 7-to-3 meat-tofat blend. If you haven't succumbed to full cardiac arrest before leaving, take a moment to admire the lovingly preserved original murals depicting West Village life in another era. 113 MacDougal St./Minetta St., 212.475.3850 $$$

RedFarm The finest Greenmarket produce infuses RedFarm's modern take on traditional dim sum dishes, like the Katz's pastrami egg roll, or the pork and crab soup dumplings. For something a little more substantial, try the diced lamb with Chinese broccoli and white asparagus; or the 40-day-aged grilled, prime Creekstone bone-in New York strip steak. 529 Hudson St./Charles St., 212.792.9700 $$$

The Spotted Pig April Bloomfield's menu is a little bit Brit, a little bit Italian and a lot of comfort. Her char-grilled Roquefort burger (with rosemary shoestring fries) is tops. The restaurant doesn't accept reservations—but then, with a fan base that includes Drew Barrymore, Kate Hudson and the Black Keys, the policy doesn't seem to be hurting business. 314 W. 11th St./Greenwich St., 212.620.0393 $$

Tertul ia After the success of Boqueria, Seamus Mullen is upping the ante with Tertulia, inspired by the Asturian cider houses he's frequented on visits to Spain. Amid brick, cider barrels and rustic wood touches, the snack-andshare- heavy menu features standards like Iberico ham and pan con tomate, along with platters of chicken paella and aged prime rib with romesco and fingerling potatoes. 359 Sixth Ave./Washington Pl., 646.559.9909 $$

The Waverly Inn At this Graydon Carter-owned restaurant, it's less about the food and more about getting past the maitre d' to a table in the dining room. If you manage that, you'll find a menu of classics like New England clam chowder, tuna tartare and braised short ribs, plus an order-if-you-dare dish of truffled macaroni and cheese, which reportedly blew Oprah Winfrey away. 16 Bank St./Waverly Pl., 917.828.1154 $$

MEATPACKING DISTRICT/ CHELSEA

The Americano Housed inside the Hotel Americano, this modern French restaurant is becoming a go-to spot for more than just tourists. Jay Z and Beyonce have dined here, as have Chelsea Clinton and Linda Evangelista. Executive Chef Joseph Buenconsejo spices up French fare with a touch of Latin flair, creating dishes like cod a la plancha with crushed potato, Brussels sprouts and salsa pozolera. 518 W. 27th St./Tenth Ave., 212.525.0000 $$

Barbuto Buzzing and bustling, Jonathan Waxman's Mediterranean bistro brings the freshest Italian-inspired plates to a stylish crowd that appreciates the venue's open-garage feel. The menu changes regularly, depending on what's in the market: Homemade pastas, crisp salads and the signature wood-fired chicken are sure bets. That goes even for "angels"— Victoria's Secret model Lily Aldridge is among the fans of Barbuto's chicken. 775 Washington St./12th St., 212.924.9700 $$

catch Top Chef victor Hung Huynh has entered the Meatpacking District dining arena with a seafood restaurant that fuses New American surf standards with Mediterranean and Asian flavors in shareable plates like crispy whole snapper with oyster mushrooms, peppers and chile-garlic sauce. Celebs like Katie Couric, Chelsea Handler and Pippa Middleton, who fell for Huynh's scallop dumplings, can't get enough of the place. 21 Ninth Ave./13th St., 212. 392.5978 $$$

Cookshop Each of Cookshop's menus— breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner—reads like a love letter to the Greenmarket, every entry an adorable little tribute to seasonality and local ingredients. Starters and salads get their own grouping, but entrees are parceled out by cooking method: sauteed Chatham cod piccata, grilled American wagyu sirloin steak, spit-roasted Cascun Farm chicken. 156 Tenth Ave./W. 20th St., 212.924.4440 $$

Del Posto With a four-star New York Times review and many of the meat and fish dishes carved or plated tableside, a studied air of entertainment is apparent in what is yet another wildly successful partnership between Mario Batali, and Joe and Lidia Bastianich. The list of chef Mark Ladner's pastas includes green garganelli with ragu, orecchiette with lambneck ragu and toasted sage. 85 Tenth Ave./16th St., 212.497.8090 $$$

Junoon Within Junoon's expansive space, the open kitchen sends out unforgettable dishes that celebrate traditional cooking techniques and flavors from across India, ranging from the classic (yogurt-cloaked lamb tandoori) to the whimsical (garam masala-crusted cauliflower lollipops with garlic-tomato chutney). Chef Vikas Khanna, a native of Amritsar, India, moved to New York in 2000 and soon found himself preparing cuisine for President Obama. 27 W. 24th St./Sixth Ave., 212.490.2100

Scarpetta Scott Conant has staked a claim in the Meatpacking District with Scarpetta. Though the dining room can be a tough reservation to score, both the bar area and outdoor patio serve the same menu, featuring superb appetizers like ultrarich polenta with truffled mushrooms and olive oil-braised octopus. Pastas (duck and foie gras ravioli) are superb, and service is better than one would expect. 355 W. 14th St./Ninth Ave., 212.691.0555 $$

Standard Grill The Standard Grill was all but a guaranteed success when it opened at the Standard Hotel in 2009. Thanks to the celeb status of hotelier Andre Balazs, beautiful people (Gwen Stefani, Gavin Rossdale, Anna Wintour) have flocked to this restaurant. Choose from a broad array of offerings by chef Dan Silverman—like charred Spanish octopus to "million dollar" whole roast chicken for two. 848 Washington St./W. 13th St., 212.645.4100 $$

Willow Road Will Malnati and Doug Jacob joined forces for Willow Road, a new dining hot spot conveniently located near the Meatpacking District. Executive Chef Todd Macdonald created fresh takes on classic American cuisine, such as the sweet tea and lemon fried chicken with orange blossom honey. Expect sightings from the style set; Diane Von Furstenberg once hosted a fashion week dinner there. 85 Tenth Ave./15th and 16th streets, 646.484.6566$$

GRAMERCY/ FLATIRON/ UNION SQUARE

Abc Kitchen The edible options in the building are as compelling as the covetable home furnishings at ABC Carpet & Home, thanks to superchef Jean-Georges Vongerichten. The kitchen, which won the James Beard award for Best New Restaurant of 2011, thrives on organic ingredients, and chef Dan Kluger's talents allow them to shine in preparations such as pretzel-dusted calamari, suckling pig and whole-wheat pizza. 35 E. 18th St./Broadway, 212. 475.5829 $$$

Blue Water Grill

This seafood restaurant won't win any awards for originality, but it's always good for a consistent, dependable meal. The after-work bar scene hops with besuited types having drinks before being spirited away to the multilevel dining room for dishes like crispy skin Scottish salmon with wild porcino mushrooms, Chilean sea bass with sticky rice and Maine lobster bisque. 31 Union Square West/16th St., 212.675.9500 $$

The Breslin April Bloomfield—the Brit chef behind the Spotted Pig—presides over this eatery inside the Ace Hotel. Bloomfield and her partner, music exec/restaurateur Ken Friedman, can overwhelm the senses with their noholds- barred, offalcentric menu; indulgences like the thrice-cooked fries, crispy sweetbreads and lamb burger are well worth it. A whole-pig roast is available upon special arrangement. 20 W. 29th St./Broadway, 212. 679.1939 $$$

ciano Shea Gallante has seen success with Ciano, a Flatiron Italian with a focus on seasonal ingredients. The $37 lunch menu features dishes like fluke crudo with lemon and parsley. Dinner offers chicken for two with hedgehog mushrooms and farro, and pappardelle with duck Bolognese and pecorino. Among those sending Ciano's reputation into the stratosphere are astronaut Buzz Aldrin and Nicole Kidman. 45 E. 22nd St./Park Ave. S. , 212.982.8422 $$$

Eleven Madison Park Every last detail of this gorgeously vaulted Madison Square Park outpost is sumptuous and swank, and the menu has opulence to match. Swiss-born, San Franciscoexpat chef (and now owner) Daniel Humm's suckling pig may be the best in the city, and the rest of the thoughtful menu—French-inflected, with farm-fresh details like heirloom tomatoes and milk-fed veal—offers innumerable delights. 11 Madison Ave./24th St., 212.889.0905$$$$

Gotham Bar & Grill Alfred Portale's relentless pursuit of perfection— demonstrated by his constant tinkering with standards—has ensured him an enduring spot in the hearts of foodie loyalists citywide. Gotham's desserts, from Pastry Chef Ron Paprocki, are especially lauded. And it boasts the distinction of being the "only restaurant to have received five consecutive three-star reviews from The New York Times." 12 E. 12th St./Fifth Ave., 212. 620.4020 $$$

Gramercy Tavern Among executive chef Michael Anthony's divine preparations: pasture-raised chicken and sausage with chestnuts and apples, and arctic char with sweet potato, cabbage and cranberry beans. Miroslav Uskokovic's desserts are also a delight, from peanut butter semifreddo with a chocolate macaroon and hot fudge, to cranberry brown butter cake with hazelnuts, sumac and ginger. 42 E. 20th St./Broadway, 212. 477.0777 $$$

The NoMad The NoMad threw open its doors in the NoMad Hotel in 2011, presided over by Daniel Humm and Will Guidara from Eleven Madison Park. Centered around a glass-enclosed atrium, The NoMad is a multiroom space that offers a specially curated wine program and chef Humm's signature dishes—like suckling pig confit with pears, cabbage and mustard—that are anything but simple. 1170 Broadway/28th St., 212.796.1500 $$$$

SD26 The authentic Italian ingredients showing up on patrons' plates burst with flavor, and touches like a salumeria where meats are sliced before your eyes and a front bar where self-serve Enomatic dispensers allow oenophiles to try wines by the glass prove this establishment is respectful of the past, but has its gaze fixed firmly on the future. 19 E. 26th St./Madison Ave., 212.265.5959 $$$

MURRAY HIH/ KIPS BAY

Artisanal Addictively snacky gougeres and an array of fondues (from classic Swiss to Stilton and sauternes) made with cheese straight from the on-site aging cave satisfy cravings en route to predictably well-executed classics like duck confit and steak frites. Be sure not to skip dessert, which is shockingly good, as is the selection of 160 wines by the glass. 2 Park Ave./32nd St., 212.725.8585 $$$

Salvation Taco April Bloomfield went beyond the gastropub fare that earned her Michelin stars to open Salvation Taco with her partner, Ken Friedman. The taqueria and cantina serves up a menu of reinterpreted Mexican favorites like the kimchee and pork bell pozole, tacos with braised lamb shoulder, and tamarind glazed pork shank with soy pickled garlic and cilantro. 145 E. 39th St./Lexington and Third avenues, 212. 865.5800 $$

MIDTOWN EAST

"21" Club Opened on New Year's Eve in 1929, this one-time speakeasy (complete with secret wine cellar) has long been a favorite of politicos like Govs. Mario and Andrew Cuomo; Mayors Ed Koch, Rudy Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg; and Presidents Bill Clinton and Richard Nixon. When there, go for the Dover sole, a signature dish prepared by chef John Greeley, and stay for the people-watching. 21 W. 52nd St./Fifth Ave., 212.582.7200 $$$$

Adour Alain Ducasse Though a la carte is available, the tasting menu is the only way to frolic through the seasonal fare, with standouts including asparagus and morels, the finest caviar and halibut dugliere. The St. Regis sets the scene for an opulent experience, but David Rockwell's redesign of what used to be Lespinasse gives the space a muted, modern touch. 2 E. 55th St./Fifth Ave., 212.710.2277$$$$

Armani Ristorante You'd expect a restaurant carrying the name of one of the greatest designers of our age to be elegant and minimal—and Armani Ristorante does not disappoint. The Italian cuisine, from homemade whole-wheat tagliarelle pasta with chanterelles, zieger cheese and crispy speck to roasted, almondcrusted veal tenderloin with seasonal mushrooms and Brussels sprout petals are amore at first bite. 717 Fifth Ave., Third Floor/W. 55th St., 212.207.1902 $$$

Casa Lever Backed by Gherardo Guarducci and Dimitri Pauli, the minds (and money) behind Sant Ambroeus, Casa Lever features original Andy Warhol paintings that look down on patrons enjoying Milanese-style crudos, risottos, pastas, meats and whole grilled fish. The place, which evokes the late 1960s/ early 1970s, has attracted the likes of Alec Baldwin, Jon Hamm and Chris Rock. 390 Park Ave./53rd St., 212.888.2700 $$$$

Crave Fishbar After the success of Crave Ceviche Bar across the street, Brian Owens and chef Todd Mitgang opened Crave Fishbar, which combines favorites from their first location like spicy tuna on plancha grilled yucca with a new menu of fresh seafood dishes that includes local black bass sashimi and olive oil poached local hake with salsa verde. 945 SecondAve./50th St., 646.895.9585 $$$

The Four Seasons This landmark venue has been shifting with the seasons decades before "seasonal" became a calling card of hot new chefs. Every 12 weeks, chef Pecko Zantilaveevan presents a new array of seasonal offerings, alongside perennial pleasers like the renowned crisp farmhouse duck. Since its opening in 1959, artwork from modern masters like Picasso, Joan Miro and Jackson Pollock have decorated the walls. 99 E. 52nd St./Park Ave., 212.754.9494$$$

La Grenouille Even more precious now that those vestiges of fine French dining La Cote Basque, Lutece and La Caravelle are but memories, La Grenouille is a place every Manhattanite needs to experience at least once. In this era of pan-everything fusion cuisine, there's something comforting about chateaubriand and oeufs a la neige served by a waiter who's not pursuing an acting career. 3 E. 52nd St./Fifth Ave., 212. 752.1495 $$$$

Le Cirque Though the current, relocated version in the supermod One Beacon Court on the eastern fringes of midtown is a far cry from its former elegant home at the Palace Hotel, regulars remain loyal and true to its consummate host, Sirio Maccioni. The overwrought and froufrou food matches the restaurant's circuslike decor, but there's still something thrilling about Maccioni welcoming you at the door. 151 E. 58th St./Lexington Ave., 212.644.0202 $$$$

Michael's Apart from the food, what keeps media VIPs like Barbara Walters and Charlie Rose coming back is the trademark welcome of Michael McCarty, who opened the place in 1989. For the best view of the action, secure a table in the front room (though it may take more than a few visits to land such favored treatment). 24 W. 55th St./ Fifth Ave., 212.767.0555 $$$

Monkey Bar Expect plenty of monkey business at this famed New York eatery, which was bought by Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter and partners. Opened during the Great Depression, the bar is located in the Hotel Elysee, haunt of bygone boldfacers Tallulah Bankhead and Tennessee Williams. These days, Monkey Bar capitalizes on its midcentury glory with a clubby feel and a comprehensive menu. 60 E. 54th St./Madison Ave., 212.308.2950 $$

MIDTOWN WEST

Ai Fiori Ai Fiori is giving chef Michael White, with his delectable pastas and succulent seafood, an ideal showcase for his talents. Taking inspiration from Italy and France, White's dinner menu stars lobster soup with Perigord black truffles and chervil. Follow it with the tender, wild striped bass with fennel puree and almonds, or the duck confit with marsala. 400 Fifth Ave./37th St., 212. 613.8660 $$$

Bar Americain If you're looking for a sophisticated Southern brunch, this Midtown eatery from New York-born Bobby Flay is a peach. Local power brokers and NYC visitors mix well here, drawn to saucedto- the-max dishes like poached eggs with Cajun hollandaise and sweet potato-crusted smokedchicken potpie. Also a draw is the daily raw bar, which features yellowtail, oysters and wild salmon. 152 W. 52nd St./Sixth Ave., 212.265.9700 $$$

Kingside Enter the Viceroy and into the Kingside for a menu designed by chef Marc Murphy that fuses together food memories from his childhood, his French heritage, Italian roots, American education and his love of travel in entrees like the brick-roasted poussin with winter squash, farro and mustard greens, and desserts like the Kingside Sundae, with meringue, hot fudge and brandied cherries. 124 W. 57th St./ Sixth and Seventh avenues, 212. 707.8000 $$$

Le Bernardin Considered by most the ne plus ultra of French fine dining in New York, Eric Ripert's elegant midtown seafood shrine offers a level of perfection in the city's cuisine scene. His delicate, meticulously crafted culinary works of art show hints of genius; the service is balletic; and sommelier Aldo Sohm happens to be the best in the world (just ask him). 155 W. 51st St./Seventh Ave., 212.554.1515 $$$$

Del Frisco's Double Eagle Steakhouse Among the treats coming out of Elvis Inniss' kitchen are the Double Eagle strip (a bone-in 26-ounce steak) and lobster macaroni and cheese. In addition to satiating hedge-fund managers, Del Frisco's has a loyal following among professional athletes, like Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, who brought then-paramour Eva Longoria to the steakhouse for dinner. 1221 SixthAve./W. 49th St., 212.575.5129 $$$$

Estiatorio Milos Seafood doesn't get much fresher than this. Select your fish from the Milos Market, after which it will be sent to the kitchen and prepared to your specifications. Paying by the pound, you might experience a bit of sticker shock when the bill arrives, so if you want to keep the tab manageable, take care that your eyes aren't bigger than your wallet. 125 W. 55th St./Sixth Ave., 212.245.7400 $$$$

The Plaza Food Hall and the Todd English Food hall This isn't your average food court; it is at the Plaza, after all. Here, you'll find a host of New York favorites in one spot, from cupcakes at Billy's Bakery to No. 7 Sub's famous sandwiches. In the Todd English Food Hall, you'll find nine food stations, like the Ocean Grill & Oyster Bar, Pasta Bar and Sushi Bar, conceived by the celebrity chef. 768 Fifth Ave./W 59th St., 212.986.9260 $$$

Stella 34 Trattoria With authentic Italian ingredients like fior di latte mozzarella, Caputo flour and San Marzano tomatoes, Stella 34 Trattoria is as close as you can get to dining in Naples. Executive Chef Jarett Appell even made sure that the water matches the pH and mineral balance of the natural spring water there for Neapolitan pizza of incredible authenticity, like the classic Margherita and the Vongole. 151 W. 34th St./ Broadway, 212.967.9251 $$

UPPER EAST SIDE

Arlington Club Surf meets turf at chef Laurent Tourondel and Tao Group's Upper East Side steakhouse, but not in the traditional manner; French technique is imbued in a menu where toro can be ordered with the signature 28-day, dry-aged cote de breuf for two. On the first Friday of every month, you can enjoy live music as you dine in the beaux-arts space. 1032 Lexington Ave./E. 74th St., 212.249.5700 $$$$

Cafe Boulud Communal tables and rich wood paneling set the scene here. Choose from a menu offering La Tradition (asparagus with poached egg and lardons) and Le Voyage (Thai lobster with coconut-lemongrass sauce and green papaya), along with specialties like butterpoached halibut. It's less formal than Boulud's haute cuisine temple Daniel, but still a treat savored by those like John and Teresa Kerry. 20 E. 76th St./Fifth Ave., 212.772.2600 $$$

Daniel In New York, there are only seven restaurants with three Michelin stars and only five with four stars from The New York Times. The notoriously exacting Daniel Boulud swept up both honors with his seasonal, contemporary French tasting menu. From the moment you pass through its revolvingdoor entrance, you're transported into a culinary haven where the service and food are unparalleled. 60 E. 65th St./Madison Ave., 212.288.0033 $$$$

Sant Ambroeus This Upper East Side version of a restaurant by the same name in Milan is a charming neighborhood spot favored by the likes of art gallerist Larry Gagosian. Sant Ambroeus serves breakfast, lunch and dinner, which means you can order griddle pancakes with blueberry compote, sugar-coated apples and fresh fruit, or—later—spelt spaghetti with clams, fava beans and spicy cherry tomatoes. 1000 Madison Ave./E. 79th St., 212.570.2211 $$$

Sirio Ristorante

Celebrated high-society restaurateur Sirio Maccioni traveled back to his childhood in Tuscany for his eponymous eatery, located in the Pierre. Imagine you're in the middle of a Fellini film while dining on dishes like the homemade burrata and truffle-stuffed tortelloni with porcini mushroom ragu and Parmesan foam. At $125, the chef's grand seven-course tasting menu is a worthwhile deal. 795 Fifth Ave./E. 61st St., 212.940.8195 $$$

Untitled Now that he's conquered MoMA, Danny Meyer and company have moved on to the smaller Whitney Museum. Expect coffee-shop classics gone mod, like huckleberrycornmeal pancakes, falafel and feta salad, Stumptown coffee and pies from cult baker Four & Twenty Blackbirds. 945 Madison Ave./75th St., 212.570.3670 $$

UPPER WEST SIDE

Bar Boulud Grab a seat at the first-come, first-serve bar and sip gruner veltliner by the glass while watching the garde-mangers carve prosciutto di San Daniele on the fire-engine-red meat slicer. Next, ogle (and eat) the restaurant's impeccable terrines, which are created under the guidance of Master Charcutier Gilles Verot and are the true stars of an otherwise wellexecuted but unsurprising menu. 1900 Broadway/64th St., 212.595.0303 $$$

Dovetail Creations like duck confit with Brussels sprouts (also available as part of the $46 Sunday Suppa) attract business suits, couples and a mature neighborhood crowd. But if you're more inclined to duck the duck in favor of meatless fare, check out the Monday night vegetarian menu, which showcases dishes such as hen-ofthe- woods mushrooms with delicata squash, barley and quail eggs. 103 W. 77th St./Columbus Ave., 212.362.3800 $$$

FP Patisserie Francois Payard once again has a flagship on the Upper East Side. Tory Burch has shown up at the dine-in bar and 40-seat Salon, as have fans of Payard's classic croque-monsieur, made with French country ham, Gruyere and bechamel, with organic mixed greens. You'll love the savories, but don't be surprised if you find yourself rushing to get to dessert. 1293 Third Ave./E. 74th St., 212. 717.5252 $$$

Jean-Georges The classical French foundation, combined with the kitchen's international passion for new flavors and combinations, makes Jean-Georges one of New York's most sought-after eating experiences. The lush redesign makes it even grander than the original, while the front barroom, Nougatine, is more than welcoming to single diners and visitors who can't get tables in back. 1 Central Park West/60th St., 212.299.3900 $$$$

Masa Tongues wagged over whether an eatery with a $450 prix fixe menu could possibly survive, but eight years later, Masa continues to attract patrons with a robust love for sushi. Though only a few tables are available, the action is at the bar, where you'll be taken for a multicourse thrill ride featuring Masa Takayama's iconoclastic take on raw fish. Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle/58th St., 212.823.9800 $$$$

Per Se West Coast import Thomas Keller brings the bankers and go-forbroke gourmands to Time Warner Center en masse. The $310 multicourse main event in the dining room is still a thing of beauty; but it's also a treat to have access to cannellini bean agnolotti or butter-poached Nova Scotia lobster for a mere 40 bucks in the bar area. Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle/58th St., 212.823.9335 $$$$

Porter House New York Big-man beef is what it's all about at this space run by Michael Lomonaco, formerly of the "21" Club. Steakhouse classics (clams casino, a crisp Caesar) accompany all sorts of outrageous cuts, plus lamb, seafood and other delicious creatures. Among those who've gotten their protein on at Porter House are Will Smith, Bruce Springsteen and Aaron Sorkin. Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle/58th St., 212.823.9500 $$$

Sugar and Plumm Discover a treasure trove of delicious sweets at Sugar and Plumm, where chef Ben Dodaro has whipped up a classic bistro menu with burgers, omelets, and delicious crepes stuffed with ingredients like house-smoked salmon, creme fraiche, red onion and capers. Master French chocolatier Thierry Atlan uses the finest raw products for their line of all-natural chocolates and colorful assortment of macarons. 377A msterdam A ve. /W. 78th St., 212.787.8778 $$

HARLEM The cecil Richard Parson and chef Alexander Smalls fused together Asian, African and American cuisines to open the Cecil. Smalls reflected on his travels when creating menu items that include the cinnamon-scented Guinea hen. The Afro/Asian/ American gumbo, with smoked turkey, Chinese chicken sausage, Gulf shrimp and crabmeat, is no doubt one of the Cecil's stars. 210 W. 118th St./ St. Nicholas Ave., 212. 866.1262 $$

Red Rooster Chef-owner Marcus Samuelsson left some of his Nordic tendencies to open this Harlem spot. Bill Clinton, whose office is nearby, is a regular, and President Obama held a benefit here last year. The diverse menu pays homage to Samuelsson's Ethiopian background, Swedish upbringing and current neighborhood, and the soulful dishes and delicious drinks are already ushering in a Harlem renaissance. 310 Lenox Ave./W. 126th St., 212.792.9001 $$

High Steaks

All-American steakhouse Bobby Van's (bobbyvans.com) is known for fine meats and solid service throughout their five Manhattan locations and their Bridgehampton outpost. Here, owner Rick Passarelli explains what keeps NYC steak lovers coming back. -Camille Hunt

The original Bobby Van's opened in Bridgehampton in 1969. How has the restaurant concept changed?

That restaurant was more of a piano bar and had a pub-like feeling. Today we're known for being a top-notch steakhouse. Since opening, it's evolved to become more of a serious restaurant.

You're known for attracting a loyal local clientele. What keeps people coming back?

Great food and great service, with a lot of history and happy memories.

How has the dining landscape changed since the first Bobby Van's steakhouse launched in NYC more than two decades ago?

The city has seen a lot more restaurants and steakhouses open. In order to stay above the competition, we remain focused on making sure everything is of the highest possible quality— and utmost class.

Describe your ideal meal at Bobby Van's.

I would start with a seafood bouquet appetizer, follow with a porterhouse steak—cooked medium rare—with creamed spinach and hash browns, and end the meal with a chocolate mousse cake with mixed berries. And to drink, I would order a California cabernet.

What do you say to someone who likes his or her steak well done, or with a side of A-1 sauce?

I would tell them to have it any way they want! A well-done steak tends to get dry and tough, but the people who order it that way have probably been eating it well done their whole lives.

What's next for the company?

We'll continue to open new places, some in NYC and some out of state. We plan to expand to Miami, Chicago and Las Vegas.

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Feast+Guide/1676892/203548/article.html.

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