MIAM November 2009 : Page 72

the radar | art images courtesy of the patricia & phillip frost art museum at fiu. Let’s Get Spiritual In a trio of esoteric exhibitions slated for the next threemonths, FIU’s Frost Museumlooks to the East | By BrettO’Bourke | With a powerful trio of exhibits running through January, Te Patricia & Phillip Frost ArtMuseum at FIU (10975 S.W. 17th St.,Miami, 305.348.2890, thefrost.fiu.edu) ismaking a none-too- subtle and somewhat familiar suggestion: give peace a chance. Tere may be no more recognizable living symbol for peace than His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, and there is certainly no group of people more capable of embodying, interpreting and extrapolating the Lama’s relevance than the 89 artists from 25 countries whose work comprises “Te Missing Peace: Artists Consider theDalai Lama” (through Jan. 10). Te exhibition is arranged thematically—interpreted portraits, Tibet, belief systems and more—and contains work by heavyweights such as Chuck Close, Richard Avedon, Laurie Anderson and Michele Oka Doner. Allmedia are represented,with the work spanning the sublime (EnriqueMartinez Celaya’s moody rumination on the path to all things, painted partially with blood) and the mundane (Jenny Holzer’s poignant, if not terribly poetic, engraving on a marble stool); the literal (large format portraits by Close and Avedon) and the abstract (a burned wood sculpture referencing life in exile by Palestinian artistTayseerBarakat). Upon entering, patrons see Bill Viola’s video of His Holiness delivering prayers and, in theory, receive a blessing fromtheman believed to be the Bodhisattva of Compassion reincarnate—a nice touch. Running concurrently at the museum is “Lacuna in Testimony” (Nov. 4-Jan. 10), an exhibition of Indian artist Navjot Altaf’s eponymous video installation, a seven-and-one- half-minute exploration into the atrocities committed during the 72 | | November 2009 Muslim/Hindu riots in the Indian state of Gujarat in 2002.Te installation, a three-channel projection, consists of 48 windows, or what the artist calls “ice slabs,” uponwhich collages of photographs of burned-down homes mix with interviews with survivors, participants and observers of the attacks. Also featured are archival images and footage taken fromsimilar religious or ethnic violence from India, Pakistan and other parts of the world, including the Holocaust and the attacks on theWorld Trade Center. A lacuna, as Altaf explains in her artist statement, is “the threshold of the indistinction between inside and outside,” where the artist sees as a connection or dialogue, an opportunity to guard against “the possibility that a lesson learned about suppression in one place will be forgotten or violated in another place or time.” Te Frost rounds out its offerings with “Te Mystical Arts of Tibet” (Nov. 4-Jan. 10), a traveling exhibition from the famed DrepungMonastery featuring traditional sand painting called dul- tson-kyil-khor,which literallymeans “mandala of colored powders.” A collaborative endeavor that will take place November 4-7, the monks drawa prescribed image consisting of geometric shapes and spiritual symbols on a large wooden platform, then painstakingly set millions of grains of colored sand in place.Te mandala will be on view at the Frost until January 6, and then, in keeping with tradition, will be destroyed (a metaphor for the impermanence of life).Half the sand will be kept in an urn, while the other half will be deposited in a nearby body of water, then make its way into the ocean where the sands are meant to spread planetary healing throughout the world. M peace signs Clockwise from top: En Vista, by eduardo del Valle and Mirta gomez, and Reincarnation, by salustiano, both works from “The Missing peace.” a view of navjot altaf’s Lacuna in Testimony video installation, from the exhibition of the same name.

The Radar Art

Let’s Get Spiritual<br /> <br /> In a trio of esoteric exhibitions slated for the next three months, FIU’s Frost Museum looks to the East<br /> <br /> By Brett O’Bourke<br /> <br /> With a powerful trio of exhibits running through January, The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU (10975 S.W. 17th St., Miami, 305.348.2890, thefrost.fiu.edu) is making a none-toosubtle and somewhat familiar suggestion: give peace a chance. <br /> <br /> There may be no more recognizable living symbol for peace than His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, and there is certainly no group of people more capable of embodying, interpreting and extrapolating the Lama’s relevance than the 89 artists from 25 countries whose work comprises “The Missing Peace: Artists Consider the Dalai Lama” (through Jan. 10).<br /> <br /> The exhibition is arranged thematically—interpreted portraits, Tibet, belief systems and more—and contains work by heavyweights such as Chuck Close, Richard Avedon, Laurie Anderson and Michele Oka Doner. All media are represented, with the work spanning the sublime (Enrique Martinez Celaya’s moody rumination on the path to all things, painted partially with blood) and the mundane (Jenny Holzer’s poignant, if not terribly poetic, engraving on a marble stool); the literal (large format portraits by Close and Avedon) and the abstract (a burned wood sculpture referencing life in exile by Palestinian artist Tayseer Barakat). Upon entering, patrons see Bill Viola’s video of His Holiness delivering prayers and, in theory, receive a blessing from the man believed to be the Bodhisattva of Compassion reincarnate—a nice touch.<br /> <br /> Running concurrently at the museum is “Lacuna in Testimony” (Nov. 4-Jan. 10), an exhibition of Indian artist Navjot Altaf ’s eponymous video installation, a seven-and-onehalf- minute exploration into the atrocities committed during the Muslim/Hindu riots in the Indian state of Gujarat in 2002. The installation, a three-channel projection, consists of 48 windows, or what the artist calls “ice slabs,” upon which collages of photographs of burned-down homes mix with interviews with survivors, participants and observers of the attacks. Also featured are archival images and footage taken from similar religious or ethnic violence from India, Pakistan and other parts of the world, including the Holocaust and the attacks on the World Trade Center. A lacuna, as Altaf explains in her artist statement, is “the threshold of the indistinction between inside and outside,” where the artist sees as a connection or dialogue, an opportunity to guard against “the possibility that a lesson learned about suppression in one place will be forgotten or violated in another place or time.”<br /> <br /> The Frost rounds out its offerings with “Te Mystical Arts of Tibet” (Nov. 4-Jan. 10), a traveling exhibition from the famed Drepung Monastery featuring traditional sand painting called dultson- kyil-khor, which literally means “mandala of colored powders.” A collaborative endeavor that will take place November 4-7, the monks draw a prescribed image consisting of geometric shapes and spiritual symbols on a large wooden platform, then painstakingly set millions of grains of colored sand in place. The mandala will be on view at the Frost until January 6, and then, in keeping with tradition, will be destroyed (a metaphor for the impermanence of life). Half the sand will be kept in an urn, while the other half will be deposited in a nearby body of water, then make its way into the ocean where the sands are meant to spread planetary healing throughout the world.

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