MIAM December 2009 : Page 62

THE RADAR | DESIGN CRYSTAL VIRUS: MASSIVE INFECTION PHOTO BY GERARD VAN HEES. GRILLAGE CHAIR IMAGE COURTESY OF FILLIOUX. PROUVE RENDERINGS COURTESY OF GALERIE PATRICK SEGUIN. Hot Stuff Smoke, bones, viruses —these are the must-see people, exhibits and objects at Design Miami/ | By Saxon Henry | Design Miami/ brings trendsetting products, exhibitions and venues to town each year, and 2009 will be no exception. Last year, the organic undulance of the Campana Brothers, the 2008 Designer(s) of the Year, highlighted a rash of amoebic shapes and whimsical materials. T is year, the burning desires of some of the world’s top design talents threaten to set off fi re alarms in the Design District tent where the fair will take place. First amongst the smoldering talent is the youngest ever Designer of the Year, Maarten Baas, a 31-year-oldDutch designer whose fi rst collection, Smoke, sent him skyrocketing to the top of the design world. His line of playfully charred furniture will be included in a retrospective of his work that he’ll curate for the occasion. Baas joins an increasingly distinguished list of winners that includes the Campanas, Tokujin Yoshioka, Marc Newson and Zaha Hadid; the honor is fast becoming a cherry on top of the cake for the design world’s elite. But the fair isn’t just about saluting established talents. Organizers of Design Miami/ are leaning ever more young and edgy, searching out and nurturing the designers of the future. In fact, Baas is practically over the hill compared to the youngest participants this year, a trio of twenty-something students from the New York School of Interior Design. Sarah Muchow, Daniel Park and Stefan Steil will create the Design Talk and Media Lounge space. T ey say their concept will deal with addressing luxury in a recession, though they’re coy on how they’ll interpret this. “T eir ages range from 21 to 24, and their minds are so fresh and inventive,” says René Estacio, one of the NYSID professors that oversees the students. “Expect their space to refl ect this youthful point of view,” he adds, hedging on the details. Also aimed at creating expectations for future design generations is Design On/Site, new programming that will bring experimental design to the District. If any facet of the fair will make a lasting impression on Miami, it will be this one, as it ups the ante on Design Miami/’s determination to turn nonconformists into design’s insider elite. Take Hadid and Newson, for example, whose permanent contributions to the District came after their participation in the fair. T is year, a guerilla dealer, a gallerist and an independent curator are prepping the next edgy visionary for stardom by presenting snapshots of his or her works. In her Design On/Site space, London-based dealer Libby Sellers—of the 2007 Design Miami/ Grandmateria fame—will debut Tidal Ossuary, which comprise new works by Julia Lohmann and Gero Grundmann. continued… vi ssa M: suri vl at sCyrystal virus: Massive kei P yb noit cefinfection by Pieke Brsenragmaono aasr, Dt Dro.og. From top: 2007 models by H. Laquerbe of Jean Prouvé’s Teacher’s house (1949) and Prefab house (1944), respectively. ’ gr uob maz A si oçnFraa nçois Azambourg’s a,ri ahc egallGrii llage chair, at er uP’ Ryr elGall lery R’Pure. 62 | | December 2009

The Radar Design

Hot Stuff<br /> <br /> Design Miami/ brings trendsetting products, exhibitions and venues to town each year, and 2009 will be no exception. Last year, the organic undulance of the Campana Brothers, the 2008 Designer(s) of the Year, highlighted a rash of amoebic shapes and whimsical materials. is year, the burning desires of some of the world’s top design talents threaten to set off fi re alarms in the Design District tent where the fair will take place.<br /> <br /> First amongst the smoldering talent is the youngest ever Designer of the Year, Maarten Baas, a 31-year-old Dutch designer whose fi rst collection, Smoke, sent him skyrocketing to the top of the design world. His line of playfully charred furniture will be included in a retrospective of his work that he’ll curate for the occasion. Baas joins an increasingly distinguished list of winners that includes the Campanas, Tokujin Yoshioka, Marc Newson and Zaha Hadid; the honor is fast becoming a cherry on top of the cake for the design world’s elite.<br /> <br /> But the fair isn’t just about saluting established talents. Organizers of Design Miami/ are leaning ever more young and edgy, searching out and nurturing the designers of the future. In fact, Baas is practically over the hill compared to the youngest participants this year, a trio of twenty-something students from the New York School of Interior Design. Sarah Muchow, Daniel Park and Stefan Steil will create the Design Talk and Media Lounge space. ey say their concept will deal with addressing luxury in a recession, though they’re coy on how they’ll interpret this. “ eir ages range from 21 to 24, and their minds are so fresh and inventive,” says René Estacio, one of the NYSID professors that oversees the students. “Expect their space to refl ect this youthful point of view,” he adds, hedging on the details.<br /> <br /> Also aimed at creating expectations for future design generations is Design On/Site, new programming that will bring experimental design to the District. If any facet of the fair will make a lasting impression on Miami, it will be this one, as it ups the ante on Design Miami/’s determination to turn nonconformists into design’s insider elite. Take Hadid and Newson, for example, whose permanent contributions to the District came after their participation in the fair. is year, a guerilla dealer, a gallerist and an independent curator are prepping the next edgy visionary for stardom by presenting snapshots of his or her works.<br /> <br /> In her Design On/Site space, London-based dealer Libby Sellers—of the 2007 Design Miami/ Grandmateria fame—will debut Tidal Ossuary, which comprise new works by Julia Lohmann and Gero Grundmann.<br /> <br /> Of the small vessels made from found bones, Sellers says, “Once deemed as rubbish, the remnants of meals long past have survived beyond their supposed use-by date and will now be returned to objects of use and worth.”<br /> <br /> Gallerist Paul Johnson of Johnson Trading Gallery will produce a Design On/Site exhibition of works by architecture’s molecular darlings Benjamin Aranda and Chris Lasch, who also designed the new temporary structure this year. Johnson will debut several new pieces by the pair, intermingled with furniture he’s shown before.<br /> <br /> Gallery R’Pure’s Design On/Site presentation will stage works by François Azambourg who, like Maarten Baas, enjoys playing with fi re. Azambourg’s oft-charred pieces will showcase his passion for materials, research, craft and process in a mis-en-scène that will emphasize beauty. e French designer is already a hot commodity, having received the Designer Prize at the Paris Furniture Fair this year—following in the footsteps of superstars like Philippe Starck, Ron Arad, Ross Lovegrove and the Bouroullec brothers.<br /> <br /> As part of this year’s Design Talks program, Giulio Cappellini will stage “Limited Forever,” a collection of nine limited-edition iconic pieces in his newly opened Design District showroom as a Design Miami/ Satellite. Cappellini will debut three updated products dubbed “Homage to Miami”—his own Bong table, Dror Benshetrit’s Peacock chair and Tom Dixon’s “S” chair will have added detailing paying tribute to our fair city.<br /> <br /> And during the daily Design Performances, Moritz Waldemeyer teams up with the band OK Go—an early YouTube sensation for its viral video of the band performing on treadmills. After the illuminated suits Waldemeyer designed for the band in 2007 were such a hit, one can only hope thousands of LED lights will be involved this time.<br /> <br /> Rounding out the sizzling selections in the tent, the gallery booths include Droog, which brings Pieke Bergmans’ “Crystal virus: Massive infection.” e burn-pocked table, a veritable sculpture of slumped glass on wood, fi ts right in with the unoffi cial theme. Another Dutch standout in Droog’s booth is Jurgen Bey’s Kokon, whose chairs and tables are melted into single pieces by a confi ning layer of PVC plastic. For his part, Paul Johnson will bring audaciously looped light fi xtures by Korean designer Kwangho Lee and furniture by beach-loving Brad Pitt-fave Max Lamb.<br /> <br /> And last but not least, Paris’ Galerie Patrick Seguin aims to bridge yet another gap, bringing architecture into the fold with a display of innovative works by the late and increasingly infl uential Jean Prouvé. “Always a true entrepreneur, Prouvé was able to break away from traditional means of construction while giving priority to experience over profi t,” says Seguin’s Emmanuelle Roux. Experience over profi t—if the smoke theme doesn’t stick, this may be a more timely conceit.

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