CHSO October 2015 : Page 34

NOW I N CH ICAGO PASSING THROUGH SAGE ADVICE By Sarah Ryan TECH SAVVY IN STRIDE New app Shoe Drop keeps footwear fresh with convenient service. SHINE ON Just in time for the changing season, the classic shoeshine is making a comeback—in a very contemporary way. Duncan Davis and Brandon Labrum, two Chicago shoe enthusiasts, have recently launched Shoe Drop , an app that promises to make getting a polish (or a new sole, for that matter) as easy as it once was. Users find a drop-off location near them (the company expects to have 200 spots, at dry cleaners, and residential and commercial high-rises, by winter), specify the desired services and then leave the shoes. A shine goes for just $8, and full restoration starts at $90—all paid through the app. “Modern, transparent and convenient,” says Nina Foley, the company’s vice president of marketing. “Oftentimes, you have to sacrifice quality for convenience, and the marriage of those sets us apart.” shoedrop.com –Jordan Porter-Woodruff 34 CS O C T O B E R 2 0 1 5 MAYA RUDOLPH PHOTO BY ROBERT TRACHTENBERG/NBC/NBCU IN THE SPOTLIGHT Maya Rudolph takes the stage as the keynote speaker at the Lynn Sage Cancer Research Foundation luncheon. Comedic superstar Maya Rudolph isn’t afraid to show her serious side, especially when it comes to family. On Oct. 15, she’ll take the stage as the keynote speaker at the Lynn Sage Cancer Research Foundation luncheon, a cause close to her heart, as she lost her mother—famed singer and Chicago native Minnie Riperton—to breast cancer at a young age. “My mother was an advocate for early detection and spoke openly about getting mammograms at a time when people didn’t talk about cancer,” Rudolph says. “I feel honored to help continue the movement toward curing cancer and know she would want nothing more than for me to do so.” Though this is Rudolph’s first Chicago trip since her childhood, the most important Chicago info has reached her: “All I ever hear about is the food and how great the people are. So I plan to eat until I pop.” Otherwise, Rudolph will be looking ahead to her busy end of the year—she has two films premiering ( Maggie’s Plan and Sisters ), which find her teaming up again with familiar faces, including her Saturday Night Live co-stars Tina Fey and Amy Poehler in the latter. “I find that I’m at my best when I’m working among friends,” she says. “If I’m not laughing at work, then I’d rather be home with my kids.” As for what to expect from her upcoming roles, Rudolph plays it cheekily coy: “In Maggie’s Plan, my name is Felicia, and I’m a dance professor married to Bill Hader. And in Sisters, my name is Brinda, and I’m a real uptight real estate agent. I feel like that info alone is gonna get butts in seats.” Chances are, she’s right. 11 am , tickets from $250, Hilton Chicago, 720 S. Michigan Ave., 312.926.7133, lynnsage.org

Now In Chicago

Sarah Ryan

PASSING THROUGH

SAGE ADVICE


IN THE SPOTLIGHT Maya Rudolph takes the stage as the keynote speaker at the Lynn Sage Cancer Research Foundation luncheon.

Comedic superstar Maya Rudolph isn't afraid to show her serious side, especially when it comes to family. On Oct. 15, she'll take the stage as the keynote speaker at the Lynn Sage Cancer Research Foundation luncheon, a cause close to her heart, as she lost her mother—famed singer and Chicago native Minnie Riperton—to breast cancer at a young age. "My mother was an advocate for early detection and spoke openly about getting mammograms at a time when people didn't talk about cancer," Rudolph says. "I feel honored to help continue the movement toward curing cancer and know she would want nothing more than for me to do so."

Though this is Rudolph's first Chicago trip since her childhood, the most important Chicago info has reached her: "All I ever hear about is the food and how great the people are. So I plan to eat until I pop." Otherwise, Rudolph will be looking ahead to her busy end of the year—she has two films premiering (Maggie's Plan and Sisters), which find her teaming up again with familiar faces, including her Saturday Night Live co-stars Tina Fey and Amy Poehler in the latter. "I find that I'm at my best when I'm working among friends," she says. "If I'm not laughing at work, then I'd rather be home with my kids." As for what to expect from her upcoming roles, Rudolph plays it cheekily coy: "In Maggie's Plan, my name is Felicia, and I'm a dance professor married to Bill Hader. And in Sisters, my name is Brinda, and I'm a real uptight real estate agent. I feel like that info alone is gonna get butts in seats." Chances are, she's right. 11AM, tickets from $250, Hilton Chicago, 720 S. Michigan Ave., 312.926.7133, lynnsage.org



IN STRIDE New app Shoe Drop keeps footwear fresh with convenient service.

TECH SAVVY

SHINE ON Just in time for the changing season, the classic shoeshine is making a comeback—in a very contemporary way. Duncan Davis and Brandon Labrum, two Chicago shoe enthusiasts, have recently launched Shoe Drop, an app that promises to make getting a polish (or a new sole, for that matter) as easy as it once was. Users find a drop-off location near them (the company expects to have 200 spots, at dry cleaners, and residential and commercial high-rises, by winter), specify the desired services and then leave the shoes. A shine goes for just $8, and full restoration starts at $90—all paid through the app. "Modern, transparent and convenient," says Nina Foley, the company's vice president of marketing. "Oftentimes, you have to sacrifice quality for convenience, and the marriage of those sets us apart." Shoedrop.com —Jordan Porter-Woodruff

TOAST OF THE TOWN
ANN TAYLOR PREVIEW DINNER, 6:30PM

Though the sun-soaked terrace of NoMI Kitchen hardly suggested it, fall was in the air—fall fashion, at least! Chicly attired guests gathered for an intimate cocktail party and dinner to preview Ann Taylor's latest fall collection. Between sips of rose and decadent courses from NoMI, the stylish set browsed the sophisticated line—filled with on-trend ponchos, oversize sweaters, moto jackets and sleek skirts—and chatted excitedly about their favorite pieces, picking one standout to complement their signature styles. NoMI, Ann Taylor and fashion-forward friends—talk about a night of good taste. —SR



1} TERRI HICKEY
Right, North Riverside, vice president of public affairs and business development, XPS "Fall fashion means it's time to update the wardrobe, and I a m always looking for an excuse to shop. I can't wait to wear the gray moto jacket!"



2} MEL MUOIO
Left, Lincoln Square, Levy lifestylist, Levy Restaurants "I absolutely fell in love with the late '70s vibe with the suede pieces, chunky sweaters and well-tailored jackets."



3} SUSU BLOCK
Center, Lincoln Park, co-founder, CO-OP PR "I love the warm tans and deep reds Ann Taylor is showing for fall. The collection has a real 'power dressing' feel."



4} AZEEZA KHAN
Left, Gold Coast, founder and designer, Azeeza "Patio weather is far and few in Chicago, so one must capitalize on it to the max. And NoMI is unarguably one of the best rooftops in the city."



5} SASHA ADLER
Left, Lakeview, design director, Nate Berkus "I loved getting to share the evening with a phenomenal group of smart, sophisticated and chic women. Actually getting to pick a piece was such a thrill!"



6 } JESSICA MOAZAMI
Left, Lakeview, fashion contributor, Chicago Tribune "After a summer of sundresses and sandals, I get excited about layering, wearing shearling, jackets and boots."



CELEB SPOTTING AMY SCHUMER popped by Lincoln Square's Davis Theater to watch her new movie, Trainwreck. Former NSYNC singer JOEY FATONE, Twilight actor KELLAN LUTZ and Olympic snowboarder LOUIE VITO partied at The Underground. Lolla headliner SAM SMITH hung out at Soho House Chicago before his show. Basketball legend MICHAEL JORDAN indulged in the dover sole at C Chicago. Outside of The Field Museum, actor KEVIN HART broke a sweat during his Nike+Run Club 5K race. CHARLI XCX was spied at Nellcote. -Chandler Rollins



SIMON SAYS NPR’s Scott Simon will once again host the discussions at the Carl Sandburg Literary Awards Dinner Oct. 21.

NOVEL IDEA

ON THE BOOKS
When asked what keeps Scott Simon—award-winning broadcaster, author and host of NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday—coming back to the Carl Sandburg Literary Awards Dinner, the answer is simple: "Well, Chicago." But it is more than just an opportunity to visit his beloved hometown. "[The awards dinner] is a chance to renew our sense of being Chicago authors," Simon says. "Even for those of us who wind up living elsewhere, that stamp of Chicago is something that we bear proudly that is with us all of our lives and is important to our work." This year, Simon—whose latest book, a moving account of his mother's final days titled Unforgettable ($25, Flatiron Books), came out this spring—will chat with legendary composer Stephen Sondheim and emerging novelist Eric Charles May. Simon anticipates another "notable and fantastic" panel, which is the signature of the event. "Sondheim is a man of the theater and has fascinating stories," he notes. "He has had a considerably different kind of experience than a lot of writers." The evening, which raises funds for the Chicago Public Library Foundation, also aims to shape the experiences of budding readers and writers. Simon says, "It is so important to have good, strong libraries where youngsters can go in an atmosphere of peace and open-mindedness to have their minds and souls nourished." Oct. 21, 6PM, tickets from $1,000, The UIC Forum, 725 W. Roosevelt Road, 312.210.9830, cplfoundation.org-SR

FAB 5

FAIRE la FETE

Fall: Longer nights, cooler temperatures and a calendar filled with the city's glammest philanthropic occasions. -CR

1 SNAP GALA The Photography Department at the Art Institute of Chicago's sixth biennial gala is the perfect reason to take a selfie. Spend the photo-filled night of Oct. 7 getting snapped, and enjoy a rousing live auction of photo sessions with internationally renowned artists to benefit the Photography Gala Fund. 6PM, tickets $500, III S. Michigan Ave., 3I2.443.3600, artic.edu/snap

2 JAZZ INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO GALA Mingle with fellow jazz enthusiasts Oct. 21 for an evening combining musical performances and recognition of the jazz community's heavyweights. This year's honorees include jazz radio journalist Richard Steele, trumpet master Art Hoyle and music educator Alan Swain. 6PM, tickets $250, The Drake Hotel, 140 E. Walton Place, 312.42 7.1676, jazzinchicago.org

3 CHICAGO STORIES GALA Victory Garden Theater's annual gala brings local celebrities like attorney Gery Chico and Make-A-Wish Illinois CEO Stephanie Springs together to t ry their hand at playwriting. On Oct. 23, watch the worldpremiere productions while raising money for the theater's student-outreach programs. 6:30PM, tickets $500-$I,000, The Ritz-Carlton Chicago, I60 E. Pearson St., 773.549.5788, victorygardens.org



FIELD DAY The stunning room at last year’s Field Museum gala

4 THE WONDERS OF CHINA GALA Discover the mysteries of the Orient Oct. 23 at the Women's Board's annual gala, celebrating the Field Museum's latest permanent exhibition, Cyrus Tang Hall of China. 6:30PM, tickets $800-$2,500, I400 S. Lake Shore Drive, 3I2.553.2007, pjhchicago.com/thefieldmuseum

5 INSPIRE GREATNESS GALA Since its inception, the Special Olympics Illinois gala has raised over $4 million. On Oct. 24, join CBS 2 Chicago anchor Rob Johnson and help change the lives of intellectually disabled youth by supporting the program. 6PM, tickets $400, Four Seasons Hotel Chicago, I20 E. Delaware Place, 630.942.56I0, inspiregreatnessgala.com

TRENDWATCH

WORK IT
Ferragamo's fall collection proves power suits still rule the runway. Here, we show how to make them the boss in the boardroom.

By Jacqueline Z. Grossnickle



1.Black wool blazer with red stripe detail, $3,800, black wool skirt with red stripe detail, $2,100, and crocodile and suede heels, $2,600, all at Salvatore Ferragamo, 312. 397.0464.

2.Resin ring, $400, by Fendi at Neiman Marcus, 312. 642.5900

3.Pigalle Follies red to black patent pump, $745, at Christian Louboutin, 312. 337.8200

4.A-Frame expandable crocodile tote bag, $3,750, by Nancy Gonzalez at Neiman Marcus, 312.642.5900

5.Rouge Coco Shine hydrating sheer lipshine in No. 112 Téméraire, $36, at Chanel counters

6.Small Bianca earrings, $470, at aureliebidermann.com

7.Dioring the Jungle necklace, $1,550, by Dior at Saks Fifth Avenue, 312.944.6500

GOOD TASTE

APPETITE for ART
Fulton Market Kitchen isn't content w i th just serving contemporary takes on American fare. Since March, the lively West Loop restaurant has given guests the chance t o see local artists in action while dining at its new artist-in-residence series, titled 5x5. This month, an all-female lineup co-curated by Locallective will craft original pieces (paintings, poems, videos and more) exploring female sexuality. Missed the show? The finished work will be exhibited for one week after creation in FMK's main room and will be available for purchase by the public, with a portion of the proceeds being donated to a charity of t he artist's choice. Simply a feast for the eyes— and taste buds. 311 N. Sangamon St., 312.733.6900, fultonmarketkitchen.com —CR



STROKE OF GENIUS Artist Julian Gilliam, aka LOGIK, paints live a at Fulton Market Kitchen.



FUR SURE Leather sole slipper with natural fur, $995, at Gucci, 312.664.5504

RARE FINDS

ECLECTIC SLIDE If you ever needed proof that Gucci's new creative director, Alessandro Michele, has the creative chops required for the job, this is it. Lined with (wait for it) kangaroo fur, Michele's Princetown slippers are among the quirkiest flats the fashion world has ever seen—and an absolute must-have for fall. Sporting Gucci's signature horsebit hardware, these street slippers, available in the same style for both men and women, sync perfectly with the gender ambiguity trend that's taken this season by storm. You may have to endure a waitlist in order to slip your feet into a pair, but once you do, you won't want to take them off—unless, of course, it's raining. —JZG

CELEBRATION

MOUTHING OFF


FOOD FOR THOUGHT Between Bites founders Molly Each, Rachel Gillman Rischall and Liz Grossman at The Dawson

By Lisa Shames // Photography by Katrina Wittkamp

It's fitting that the idea for Between Bites, a live literary event dedicated to food-inspired storytelling, came about when Molly Each, Rachel Gillman Rischall and Liz Grossman were dining together. After all, with careers in the food industry, the three friends break bread often. But their concept for a quarterly event, with an overarching theme like "Inside/ Outside" or "Hot/Cold," where food writers, chefs and restaurateurs read original stories in front of an audience (and help raise money for charity in the process) was unique.

"Chefs get to be writers, and writers get to be performers," says Rischall. Adds Grossman, "It's interesting to see what sort of stories the theme inspires and the different ways people interpret it." To further tie in the series' focus on food, host restaurants change with each event.

Two years and seven events later, Between Bites, which recently received nonprofit status, has featured 42 readers, including restaurateur Kevin Boehm, media phenom Steve Dolinsky and chef Jason Hammel; entertained 650 guests; and raised nearly $15,000 for charities. And it shows no signs of slowing down. Future plans include podcasts, a magazine and branching out to other cities. "To see people you only know from working in a kitchen get up and tell a story with the crowd in the palm of their hands," says Each, "is always fun to watch." Oct. 19, $30 (includes small bites and wine), Green Street Smoked Meats, 112 N. Green St., between-bites.com

FRESH PICKS

Best Buds

Known for her irreverent choices and tongue-incheek touches, Miuccia Prada tends to zig where other designers zag. In 2011, she sent models down the catwalk in banana prints complete with Dr. Seusslike fur stoles. And who can forget those bejeweled tube socks from her 2014 collection? This fall, Prada girls go prim: Think powdery pastels, empire waists, opera gloves and floral brooches. Yes, brooches. Only these particular pins aren't intended for granny. Inspired by Bakelite from the '40s, these oversize pin-ons have a whole bouquet of intrigue, with saturated colors and glittering diamante detail. But unlike the versions of days gone by, they're not an accessory to the look; they are the look. We're calling it now: Brooches are back. -JZG



GETTING PINNED Pins, $850 each, at Prada, 312.951.1113

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Now+In+Chicago/2280422/274225/article.html.

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