WASH October 2015 : Page 120

FOOD & DR INK t re n d s TREMENDOUS TOASTS At least 12 crostini offerings are available at Fig & Olive at CityCenterDC. LITTLE WONDERS Wildly creative crostini populate fall menus across town—and make for a trend worth savoring. By David Hagedorn // Photography by Greg Powers Crostini, those delightfully crunchy little slices of toasted bread teeming with all kinds of savory goodies, are all the rage in Washington, popping up on some of the most alluring menus. ( e word means “little toasts” in Italian.) Here’s where we have crostini crushes this fall. Fig & Olive The resto has an entire display kitchen attached to its bar where a cook turns out almost a dozen offerings. The kitchen slices baguettes lengthwise to create rectangular rafts of toasted bread as conveyances for myriad spreads and toppings. Our favorites include ricotta cheese topped with lemon and thyme-scented asparagus and peas; guacamole spread with poached shrimp, cilantro and tomato; basil pesto with creamy burrata cheese, tomato and balsamic vinegar; cured salmon with dill, cucumber yogurt and radishes; and ricotta cheese crowned with prosciutto, walnut chutney and rehydrated fi gs. Three for $12, 934 Palmer Alley NW, 202.559.5004, fi gandolive.com The Red Hen Whipped-ricotta crostini still prove to be one of the Bloomingdale hot spot’s biggest sellers. From a craft standpoint, explains chef Mike Friedman, all of their components work in perfect harmony: the dairy richness of the ricotta, the tartness of the balsamic vinegar and brown-butter glaze, the sweetness of truffl e-scented honey and the slight bitterness of the char on the shards of rustic bread toasted over Virginia oak in the restaurant’s wood-burning hearth. “These crostini have been on the menu since The Red Hen’s inception,” says Friedman, “and I have no plans for taking them off anytime soon.” $6, 1822 First St. NW, 202.525.3021, theredhendc.com Mintwood Place “Good crostini start with French bread,” insists chef Cedric Maupillier at his Adams Morgan restaurant. He takes a par-baked fi celle and piles it high with his version of chopped liver. Maupillier sautees chicken livers in butter seasoned with thyme, rosemary and garlic, chops them coarsely and mixes them with chopped egg whites and caramelized onions. A dressing made with hard-boiled yolks, mayonnaise and Dijon mustard binds the mixture. The appetizer is topped with shaved pickled Jerusalem artichokes, chopped chives, fl eur de sel and colorful petals of edible fl owers. $6, 1813 Columbia Road NW, 202.234.6732, mintwoodplace.com 120 DC O C T O B E R 2 0 1 5

Food & Drink Trend

David Hagedorn

LITTLE^ WONDERS

Wildly creative crostini populate fall menus across town—and make for a trend worth savoring.

Crostini, those delightfully crunchy little slices of toasted bread teeming with all kinds of savory goodies, are all the rage in Washington, popping up on some of the most alluring menus. (The word means "little toasts" in Italian.) Here's where we have crostini crushes this fall.

Fig & Olive

The resto has an entire display kitchen attached to its bar where a cook turns out almost a dozen offerings. The kitchen slices baguettes lengthwise to create rectangular rafts of toasted bread as conveyances for myriad spreads and toppings. Our favorites include ricotta cheese topped with lemon and thyme-scented asparagus and peas; guacamole spread with poached shrimp, cilantro and tomato; basil pesto with creamy burrata cheese, tomato and balsamic vinegar; cured salmon with dill, cucumber yogurt and radishes; and ricotta cheese crowned with prosciutto, walnut chutney and rehydrated figs. Three for $12, 934 Palmer Alley NW, 202.559.5004, figandolive.com

The Red Hen

Whipped-ricotta crostini still prove to be one of the Bloomingdale hot spot's biggest sellers. From a craft standpoint, explains chef Mike Friedman, all of their components work in perfect harmony: the dairy richness of the ricotta, the tartness of the balsamic vinegar and brown-butter glaze, the sweetness of truffle-scented honey and the slight bitterness of the char on the shards of rustic bread toasted over Virginia oak in the restaurant's wood-burning hearth. "These crostini have been on the menu since The Red Hen's inception," says Friedman, "and I have no plans for taking them off anytime soon." $6, 1822 First St. NW, 202.525.3021, theredhendc.com

Mintwood Place

"Good crostini start with French bread," insists chef Cedric Maupillier at his Adams Morgan restaurant. He takes a par-baked ficelle and piles it high with his version of chopped liver. Maupillier sautees chicken livers in butter seasoned with thyme, rosemary and garlic, chops them coarsely and mixes them with chopped egg whites and caramelized onions. A dressing made with hard-boiled yolks, mayonnaise and Dijon mustard binds the mixture. The appetizer is topped with shaved pickled Jerusalem artichokes, chopped chives, fleur de sel and colorful petals of edible flowers. $6, 1813 Columbia Road NW, 202. 234.6732, mintwoodplace.com

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Food+%26+Drink+Trend/2281186/274231/article.html.

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