HBCH October 2015 : Page 78

LIVING IN CHICAGO| ART LED-LIGHT THE WAY Part of the solarise installations, “Florescence” transforms the Show House into a colorful display using solar power. Inspired by the blue and red light spectrums of sunlight that plants use in photosynthesis, the canopy of red and blue petals places the viewer in a “charged” environment that accentuates the regenerating properties of plants. 78 INTERIORS FALL/WINTER 2015 PHOTO BY JOHN FAIER “Artwork becomes alive when the To accompany the exhibit, public interacts with it,” explains Owen Clayton Condon, a Chicago-Petra Bachmaier of the ve related based composer (and Bachmaier and installations collectively titled solarise: Gallero’s longtime collaborator), has a sea of all colors that she and Luftwerk created an original score using plant Studio co-founder Sean Gallero will material as a percussive instrument, A local design studio uses natural and LED unveil this fall at the Gar eld Park which will play during audio tours lighting to create an immersive interactive Conservatory. “We took the story of and during the evenings. “Two experience at the Garfi eld Park Conservatory. the architecture and plant life and weeks ago, we made recordings created an artistic interpretation,” says in the desert house with cacti and By Tate Gunnerson Bachmaier, noting that each of the succulents,” Bachmaier explains. installations uses either natural light “Cacti have a scale from low to high, or LEDs to create 3-D experiences. and depending on how much water Since the duo founded Luftwerk Studio in 2007, they have become they contain, their bodies sound di erent. It’s fascinating.” known for their fantastical designs, which combine light and sound to create e exhibit will run from Sept. 23, 2015 through Sept. 22, 2016. fully immersive installations at locations such as the Chicago Cultural e installation titled “ e Beacon,” however, which features LED lights Center and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house. e series at the running vertically along the Palm House’s metal frame, will remain in place Gar eld Park Conservatory includes installations like “Florescence,” which inde nitely, which marks the rst time Luftwerk Studio has created a semi-features a geometric membrane with repeating pieces of red and blue acrylic permanent display. Like the plants inside, it will be run entirely by solar power. that have been cut to resemble ower petals. “It takes inspiration from “We wanted to make the connection that plants use the sun and we also use the spectrum of color that plants receive in order to grow and blossom,” the sun to make energy,” Bachmaier explains. “We’re interested in creating Bachmaier says. “As the light changes throughout the year, it will totally interactive venues, and this will be a playful environment that allows people change the experience of the piece.” to explore.” 300 N. Central Park Ave., 312.746.5100, gar eldconservatory.org GREEN LIGHT

Living In Chicago Art

Tate Gunnerson

GREEN LIGHT

A local design studio uses natural and LED lighting to create an immersive interactive experience at the Garfield Park Conservatory.

"Artwork becomes alive when the public interacts with it," explains Petra Bachmaier of the five related installations collectively titled solarise: a sea of all colors that she and Luftwerk Studio co-founder Sean Gallero will unveil this fall at the Garfield Park Conservatory. "We took the story of the architecture and plant life and created an artistic interpretation," says Bachmaier, noting that each of the installations uses either natural light or LEDs to create 3-D experiences.

Since the duo founded Luftwerk Studio in 2007, they have become known for their fantastical designs, which combine light and sound to create fully immersive installations at locations such as the Chicago Cultural Center and Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater house. The series at the Garfield Park Conservatory includes installations like "Florescence," which features a geometric membrane with repeating pieces of red and blue acrylic that have been cut to resemble flower petals. "It takes inspiration from the spectrum of color that plants receive in order to grow and blossom," Bachmaier says. "As the light changes throughout the year, it will totally change the experience of the piece."

To accompany the exhibit, Owen Clayton Condon, a Chicagobased composer (and Bachmaier and Gallero's longtime collaborator), has created an original score using plant material as a percussive instrument, which will play during audio tours and during the evenings. "Two weeks ago, we made recordings in the desert house with cacti and succulents," Bachmaier explains."Cacti have a scale from low to high, and depending on how much water they contain, their bodies sound different. It's fascinating."

The exhibit will run from Sept. 23, 2015 through Sept. 22, 2016.The installation titled "The Beacon," however, which features LED lights running vertically along the Palm House's metal frame, will remain in place indefinitely, which marks the first time Luftwerk Studio has created a semipermanent display. Like the plants inside, it will be run entirely by solar power."We wanted to make the connection that plants use the sun and we also use the sun to make energy," Bachmaier explains. "We're interested in creating interactive venues, and this will be a playful environment that allows people to explore." 300N. Central Park Ave., 312.746.5100, garfieldconservatory.org

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Living+In+Chicago+Art/2285006/274842/article.html.

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