MBCH February 2016 : Page 44

LIFE IN CHICAGO HOME KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL From top: A variety of materials including stainless steel, granite, marble, wood and glass “give more depth and texture to the space, but, at the same time, are still coordinated,” says designer De Giulio; the two islands allow chef Bell to bring in additional culinary staff when doing large parties, while the second sink area provides additional prep space. Home on the Range Mick De Giulio designs a sleek kitchen—both family-friendly and chic—for a professional-chef client. | By Lisa Shames | | Photography by Dave Burk | 44 | | Spring 2016 STYLING BY HILARY ROSE When it came to creating the home kitchen of his dreams, professional chef Craig Bell had an exact vision of what he wanted. And he knew just the guy to make it happen: Mick De Giulio of de Giulio Kitchen Design (degiuliodesign.com). Not only has De Giulio been designing award-winning residential and commercial kitchens for more than 40 years, but the two have worked together on numerous projects. “We decided to start with the kitchen and make everything else work around that,” says Bell of the renovated 110-year-old home he shares with his wife, Adrienne Fasano, and four children. Also key was ensuring the kitchen allowed for easy interaction, whether Bell was “feeding the kids before school or running a party for 75 people.” Part of that was achieved by the open design of the 1,425-square-foot first floor of the Roscoe Village home, which includes a family room, living room, library and spacious kitchen and eating area. “I joke with Craig that his kids are going to say, ‘We didn’t have a home, we had a kitchen,’” says De Giulio. The two parallel islands—one with a 48-inch Wolf range top and the other with a Wolf warming drawer, d ishwa sher, brushed stainless steel sink and built-in chopping block—add to the synergy. “I tell people to think about what makes them happy about cooking when designing their kitchens,” says Bell. “For me, it’s about sharing my food passion with other people.” A d d i n g t o t he s p a c e ’s functionality are the de Giulio Collection Metal Boy stainless steel-framed cabinets outfitted with glass doors. “Those let Craig see everything at a moment’s notice,” says De Giulio. “Chefs are always thinking about every small movement and how they add up over a day.” But not everything should be visible. “Because it’s an open kitchen, you need a put-away design too, so it doesn’t look cluttered,” says De Giulio. Behind the beautiful wood cabinetry, you’ll find a toaster and blender tucked away in a marble-lined work area. While it’s hard for Bell to name just one aspect of his new kitchen as his favorite, the “pure openness of it” tops his list. “When you don’t lose that connectivity to anyone, it can inspire you to spend more time in the kitchen, since it’s not like the party is in the next room,” says Bell. “You are the party.”

Life In Chicago Home

Lisa Shames

Home on the Range

Mick De Giulio designs a sleek kitchen—both family-friendly and chic—for a professional-chef client.

When it came to creating the home kitchen of his dreams, professional chef Craig Bell had an exact vision of what he wanted. And he knew just the guy to make it happen: Mick De Giulio of de Giulio Kitchen Design (degiuliodesign.com). Not only has De Giulio been designing award-winning residential and commercial kitchens for more than 40 years, but the two have worked together on numerous projects.

“We decided to start with the kitchen and make everything else work around that,” says Bell of the renovated 110-year-old home he shares with his wife, Adrienne Fasano, and four children. Also key was ensuring the kitchen allowed for easy interaction, whether Bell was “feeding the kids before school or running a party for 75 people.”

Part of that was achieved by the open design of the 1,425-squarefoot first floor of the Roscoe Village home, which includes a family room, living room, library and spacious kitchen and eating area. “I joke with Craig that his kids are going to say, ‘We didn’t have a home, we had a kitchen,’” says De Giulio.

The two parallel islands—one with a 48-inch Wolf range top and the other with a Wolf warming drawer, dishwasher, brushed stainless steel sink and built-in chopping block—add to the synergy. “I tell people to think about what makes them happy about cooking when designing their kitchens,” says Bell. “For me, it’s about sharing my food passion with other people.”

Adding to the space’s functionality are the de Giulio Collection Metal Boy stainless steel-framed cabinets outfitted with glass doors. “Those let Craig see everything at a moment’s notice,” says De Giulio. “Chefs are always thinking about every small movement and how they add up over a day.”

But not everything should be visible. “Because it’s an open kitchen, you need a put-away design too, so it doesn’t look cluttered,” says De Giulio. Behind the beautiful wood cabinetry, you’ll find a toaster and blender tucked away in a marble-lined work area.

While it’s hard for Bell to name just one aspect of his new kitchen as his favorite, the “pure openness of it” tops his list. “When you don’t lose that connectivity to anyone, it can inspire you to spend more time in the kitchen, since it’s not like the party is in the next room,” says Bell. “You are the party.”

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Life+In+Chicago+Home/2396069/290524/article.html.

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