BEAC July 15, 2016 : Page 50

BEACH READS PLEASANT SPACES Clockwise from top left: A Deborah Berke-designed oceanside space; the central positioning of this marble and steel fi replace offers an element of surprise; Berke. RULES TO LIVE BY As if being the newly appointed rst female dean at Yale’s School of Architecture weren’t enough to keep full-time architect Deborah Berke busy, her inspiring and instructional design book, House Rules: An Architect’s Guide to Modern Life ($45, Rizzoli), outlining her eight principles for design, hit bookstores this summer. Whether she’s working on stunningly modern residences, historical hotels or institutional buildings, Berke’s guidelines have stayed the same through the years. e long-time East Hampton resident shares her thoughts on applying these rules to life at the beach. –Sarah Newell 50 | Commandments, and seven didn’t seem like enough—that’s a coy answer meant to be a laugh! Truthfully, this was the right number. I thought about what I’ve always repeated to clients, and I found myself thinking, Wow, I’ve said this a lot of times—I should write this down. What’s the most important rule in your life? How did you settle on these eight House Rules? Ten seemed like the Ten our family is in di erent locations at di erent times of the day. ere’s a lot of moving from inside to outside. In the book, you talk about how people live in homes differently today because of technology. How has that impacted your design process? People “Honor daily life.” e simple things you do, both alone and with your family, really do matter. Treating your daily life, of which your home is a big part, with respect makes your life better. Do the rules apply differently to someone’s beach or summer home? bemoan smartphones and laptops, all the things that remove you from engagement and interaction. But they’re good when they allow you to be together. You don’t have to leave the room to call Grandma anymore. When my daughter was in school, she could be on the laptop on the couch doing homework while I was reading the newspaper. Technology allows a kind of togetherness. Not really. Rule One is “property lines don’t de ne a site.” Each location gets an adjusted interpretation. At the beach, the rooms can be inside or outside on the lawn, under the umbrella or on the terrace. You don’t have to be on the beach to see or hear the ocean. I have a beautiful piece of property with big, old trees in East Hampton. We wanted access from lots of di erent points because when we’re there, What’s the biggest challenge when designing for the Hamptons? In a funny way, it’s very at. Much of the land in eastern Long Island has very little topography, but you can add texture to the landscape with trees or hedges. At my property, we carved a 16-inch ledge into the landscape, and it gives a break to the atness. You don’t need to do much to change the landscape. | Design & Architecture 2016

Cultured Beach Reads

RULES TO LIVE BY

As if being the newly appointed first female dean at Yale’s School of Architecture weren’t enough to keep full-time architect Deborah Berke busy, her inspiring and instructional design book, House Rules: An Architect’s Guide to Modern Life ($45, Rizzoli), outlining her eight principles for design, hit bookstores this summer. Whether she’s working on stunningly modern residences, historical hotels or institutional buildings, Berke’s guidelines have stayed the same through the years. The long-time East Hampton resident shares her thoughts on applying these rules to life at the beach. —Sarah Newell

How did you settle on these eight House Rules? Ten seemed like the Ten Commandments, and seven didn’t seem like enough—that’s a coy answer meant to be a laugh! Truthfully, this was the right number. I thought about what I’ve always repeated to clients, and I found myself thinking, Wow, I’ve said this a lot of times—I should write this down.

What's the most important rule in your life ? “Honor daily life.” The simple things you do, both alone and with your family, really do matter. Treating your daily life, of which your home is a big part, with respect makes your life better.

Do the rules apply differently to someone's beach or summer home? Not really. Rule One is “property lines don’t define a site.” Each location gets an adjusted interpretation. At the beach, the rooms can be inside or outside on the lawn, under the umbrella or on the terrace. You don’t have to be on the beach to see or hear the ocean. I have a beautiful piece of property with big, old trees in East Hampton. We wanted access from lots of different points because when we’re there, our family is in different locations at different times of the day. There’s a lot of moving from inside to outside.

In the book, you talk about how people live in homes differently today because of technology. How has that impacted your design process? People bemoan smartphones and laptops, all the things that remove you from engagement and interaction. But they’re good when they allow you to be together. You don’t have to leave the room to call Grandma anymore. When my daughter was in school, she could be on the laptop on the couch doing homework while I was reading the newspaper. Technology allows a kind of togetherness.

What's the biggest challenge when designing for the Hamptons? In a funny way, it’s very flat. Much of the land in eastern Long Island has very little topography, but you can add texture to the landscape with trees or hedges. At my property, we carved a 16-inch ledge into the landscape, and it gives a break to the flatness. You don’t need to do much to change the landscape.

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Cultured+Beach+Reads/2530797/319844/article.html.

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