CHSO October 2016 : Page 64

ST Y L E & D E S IG N s t yl e ON THE HOOK This silk taffeta gown, designed in 1949 and later gifted to Mrs. Donald A. Deutsch, is fastened by only a single hook and eye. DRESS SUCCESS Making Mainbocher: The First American Couturier , the latest exhibition from the Chicago History Museum’s esteemed Costume Collection, pays homage to an international fashion icon with Windy City roots. By Sarah Ryan 64 CS O C T O B E R 2 0 1 6 Before his fashion house became one of the most sought-after names in couture, Main Rousseau Bocher was just a student of modest means on Chicago’s West Side with a talent for sketching. His unlikely path to fashion prominence—which took him from a stalled music career to editor-in-chief of Vogue Paris to starting his own influential eponymous house at age 40 (he combined his first and last names as a nod to his favorite couturiers of the day)—is documented in the Chicago History Museum’s Making Mainbocher: The First American Couturier , which opens Oct. 22. The exhibit features 30 garments as well as illustrations, video, interactive elements and oral histories that define his storied career, which saw him dress some of the most notable women, including Chicago’s Mrs. A. Watson Armour III and Wallis Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor, whose iconic wedding dress he designed. “The elements he introduced to fashion continue to influence the way we dress,” says Petra Slinkard, curator of costumes at the museum. “He has this dichotomous nature: On one hand, he evolved into this very cosmopolitan, sophisticated entity, but he maintained his Midwestern sensibility. His work ethic is all Chicago. He never stopped striving for more.” Opening night gala Oct. 21, 6:30 pm , tickets $375, 1601 N. Clark St., 312.642.4600, chicagohistory.org

Style

Sarah Ryan



ON THE HOOK This silk taffeta gown, designed in 1949 and later gifted to Mrs. Donald A. Deutsch, is fastened by only a single hook and eye.

DRESS SUCCESS
Making Mainbocher: The First American Couturier, the latest exhibition from the Chicago History Museum’s esteemed Costume Collection, pays homage to an international fashion icon with Windy City roots.

Before his fashion house became one of the most sought-after names in couture, Main Rousseau Bocher was just a student of modest means on Chicago’s West Side with a talent for sketching. His unlikely path to fashion prominence—which took him from a stalled music career to editor-in-chief of Vogue Paris to starting his own influential eponymous house at age 40 (he combined his first and last names as a nod to his favorite couturiers of the day)—is documented in the Chicago History Museum’s Making Mainbocher: The First American Couturier, which opens Oct. 22. The exhibit features 30 garments as well as illustrations, video, interactive elements and oral histories that define his storied career, which saw him dress some of the most notable women, including Chicago’s Mrs. A. Watson Armour III and Wallis Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor, whose iconic wedding dress he designed. “The elements he introduced to fashion continue to influence the way we dress,” says Petra Slinkard, curator of costumes at the museum. “He has this dichotomous nature: On one hand, he evolved into this very cosmopolitan, sophisticated entity, but he maintained his Midwestern sensibility. His work ethic is all Chicago. He never stopped striving for more.” Opening night gala Oct. 21, 6:30pm, tickets $375, 1601 N. Clark St., 312.642.4600, chicagohistory.org

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Style/2594286/341459/article.html.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here