ASPN February 2017 : Insert-6

I N T E R I OR S C OL OR A D O p ro f i l e DESIGNING WOMAN By Laurel Miller Photography by Katie Cassetta What’s old is new again thanks to one restaurant designer’s penchant for combining reclaimed materials with a touch of luxe. There was a time when ski-town restaurant decor fell into two main categories: Alpine kitsch or faux log cabin. In recent years, however, Aspen has welcomed a new generation of both high-concept and stylized rustic-mod eateries. Two standouts that have received national accolades for their interiors as well as their cuisine are Grey Lady (greyladyaspen.com) and The Monarch (monarchaspen.com). Interior designer Emily Siegel, owner of Manhattan’s Emily Frantz Design, has helped give both hot spots their luxe aesthetic appeal. Th e 32-year-old former Aspen resident has an aptitude for designing restaurants, bestowing upon them a sense of place, hallmarked by the use of reclaimed materials and innovative new products with a sustainable ethos. It was in Aspen that Siegel met her fiance, Ryan Chadwick. Along with business partner Ian Perry, Chadwick opened popular Aspen nightspot Escobar in 2010, and in 2012, they launched the fi rst Grey Lady in Manhattan, followed by a second in Aspen in late 2015. Siegel’s fi rst independent project with Chadwick was Grey Lady New York, located in a Depression-era former bank on the Lower East Side. “I feel like our backgrounds’ serendipitously converged,” she says. “Neither of us had experience owning or designing restaurants when we met.” The eatery soon received rave reviews for its food and bar program, as well as the moody interior. Siegel brought that same sensibility to the Aspen location. “We wanted to imbue it with some of the New York elements—a 6 I NTE R I O R S C OL OR A D O M I D WI NTE R 2 0 1 7 | M O D E R N L UXU R Y . C O M

Interiors Colorado Profile

Laurel Miller

DESIGNING WOMAN

What’s old is new again thanks to one restaurant designer’s penchant for combining reclaimed materials with a touch of luxe.

There was a time when ski-town restaurant decor fell into two main categories: Alpine kitsch or faux log cabin. In recent years, however, Aspen has welcomed a new generation of both high-concept and stylized rusticmod eateries. Two standouts that have received national accolades for their interiors as well as their cuisine are Grey Lady (greyladyaspen.com) and The Monarch (monarchaspen.com). Interior designer Emily Siegel, owner of Manhattan’s Emily Frantz Design, has helped give both hot spots their luxe aesthetic appeal. Th e 32-year-old former Aspen resident has an aptitude for designing restaurants, bestowing upon them a sense of place, hallmarked by the use of reclaimed materials and innovative new products with a sustainable ethos.

It was in Aspen that Siegel met her fiance, Ryan Chadwick. Along with business partner Ian Perry, Chadwick opened popular Aspen nightspot Escobar in 2010, and in 2012, they launched the fi rst Grey Lady in Manhattan, followed by a second in Aspen in late 2015.

Siegel’s first independent project with Chadwick was Grey Lady New York, located in a Depression-era former bank on the Lower East Side. “I feel like our backgrounds’ serendipitously converged,” she says. “Neither of us had experience owning or designing restaurants when we met.”

The eatery soon received rave reviews for its food and bar program, as well as the moody interior. Siegel brought that same sensibility to the Aspen location. “We wanted to imbue it with some of the New York elements—a weathered look and patinaed finishes. We painted the interior brick gray, sanded it down and reupholstered the banquettes with blue velvet to incorporate warmth and softness. The overall goal was to evoke a summery, coastal vibe.” The pièce de résistance was the installation of a 104-year-old handpressed tin ceiling, salvaged from a building in Manhattan.

The Monarch—owned by longtime Aspen restaurateurs Craig and Samantha Cordts- Pearce of the CP Restaurant Group—is an old-school steakhouse, with a sleek, masculine London gentlemen’s club vibe. Siegel collaborated with Craig on the design to turn his vision into reality. “We started in mid- October and needed to open by Christmas,” recalls Siegel. “We added new millwork to the walls, gutted and designed a new back bar and incorporated Old World elements like corbels, sconces, bar lamps, mirrors and brass rails, accented by vintage books and found objects.”

Siegel custom-designed the tufted, sage-hued velvet banquettes, and the bar stools were done in a semi-aniline Italian leather that preserves the natural scarring on the hide. She is particularly proud of two features: the sound-absorbing fabric on the ceiling, produced from recycled materials, and the built-out service area. “I wanted to keep the dining room open, so I focused on making the wait station beautiful with open shelving, marble and antiqued brass hardware,” she says.

Siegel works collaboratively with clients, “finding balance between old and new elements, using sustainable materials whenever possible, and adding texture and layering to make a space more interesting.” For restaurants, functionality is key. “You need to understand the objectives of a given space. In New York, there’s only room for about 8 inches between tables. But in Aspen, restaurants are bigger; you need more space to accommodate customers wearing ski boots or bulky clothes,” says Siegel. “Aspen isn’t New York, and it’s important to me to honor that in my work.” 92 Orchard St., New York, 203.858.7137, emilyfrantz.com

Emily Siegel on Design Details

Maxfine tiles: “High-end porcelain tiles from Italy are a great alternative to marble because they’re superdurable and lightweight. They’re great for kitchens because they can withstand extremely high mperatures. They’re also nonporous so they don’t harbor bacteria, and they can be cleaned with any solution, unlike natural stone.”

Velvet: “I love incorporating a good, rich velvet into upholstery, draperies, pillows, sofas or chairs for texture and a plush effect, especially if there’s some silk woven into the fabric. The result is a deep saturated color, with a glimmer of light and a luxurious feel.”

Brass: “Finish is a big thing. I prefer antiqued or patinaed brass finishes. They offer much more character, depth and movement to a palette than a perfect, shiny appearance. In general, I like darker finishes and blackened metals. I also love salvaged steel tabletops or unique hardware, which can dramatically change a piece of millwork.”

Wood: “The addition of wood to any project is a must. It instantly warms a space and can be done in countless ways. I use reclaimed wood, salvaged materials and found objects that work to tell the story behind a space. Reusing materials is such a good way to go—they take on a new life.”

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Interiors+Colorado+Profile/2709467/383318/article.html.

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