CHSO March 2017 : Page 36

NOW I N CH ICAGO HEALTHY LIVING GREEN GODDESS Jessica Murnane’s new cookbook makes plant-based eating a breeze —and quite delicious. By Jessie Sardina // Photography by Nicole Franzen When Jessica Murnane first moved to a plant-based diet six years ago, her inaugural meal was a far cry from the fresh and colorful dishes the wellness advocate, who previously lived in Chicago, has become known for. “It was,” she says, “a salsa taco. I literally had no clue how to cook.” The longtime sufferer of endometriosis decided to give the green life a shot after doctors suggested her only chance at a pain-free life would be a hysterectomy. “One of my friends found some information about how a plant-based diet could help endometriosis pain,” she remembers. “I was very skeptical, but then every single day I just felt better and better, and then I felt so great that I ended up not getting the hysterectomy.” Since then, the for mer ju n k-food obsessive (Murnane admits her major food groups were once Sour Patch Kids and Diet Coke) has gone on to found One Part Plant—a movement aimed toward helping people eat one plant-based meal each day. And through One Part Plant: A Simple Guide to Eating Real, One Meal at a Time ($28, Harper Wave), Murnane’s new cookbook, she’s helping home cooks everywhere see the green side. With unfussy recipes, and tips for grocery shopping and eating out—plus an enlightening forward from writer, director and fellow endometriosis sufferer Lena Dunham, and recipes from big-name chefs like Ruth Reichl and Daniel Holzman—Murnane’s main goal is to make eating well approachable. “I am not expecting you to go crazy and become a raw, vegan, gluten-free person for the rest of your life,” she says. “There is zero judgement when you pick up this cookbook.” From left: Daniel Holzman’s Chopped Vegetable Salad is one of the recipes in the new book One Part Plant ; the author, Jessica Murnane. CELEB SPOTTING RUMER WILLIS and Dancing With the Stars professional SHARNA BURGESS danced the night away at The Flamingo Rum Club, which is quickly becoming River North’s latest hot spot (NFL quarterback CAM NEWTON also recently stopped by). Chicago Bulls star DWYANE WADE enjoyed the pescado frito at Ronero. SCOTT DISICK and his children Mason and Penelope hosted the grand opening of Sugar Factory Chicago. The Bachelor star NICK VIALL dined with friends at Siena Tavern. Chicago Med actor NICK GEHLFUSS noshed on a Morning Veggie Wrap at LYFE Kitchen in Streeterville. JENNIE GARTH enjoyed Public House on a recent visit. –Sarah Ryan 36 CS M A R C H 2 0 1 7 | M O D E R N L U X U R Y. C O M

Now

Jessie Sardina

HEALTHY LIVING

GREEN GODDESS
Jessica Murnane’s new cookbook makes plant-based eating a breeze— and quite delicious.

When Jessica Murnane first moved to a plant-based diet six years ago, her inaugural meal was a far cry from the fresh and colorful dishes the wellness advocate, who previously lived in Chicago, has become known for. “It was,” she says, “a salsa taco. I literally had no clue how to cook.” The longtime sufferer of endometriosis decided to give the green life a shot after doctors suggested her only chance at a pain-free life would be a hysterectomy. “One of my friends found some information about how a plant-based diet could help endometriosis pain,” she remembers. “I was very skeptical, but then every single day I just felt better and better, and then I felt so great that I ended up not getting the hysterectomy.” Since then, the former junk-food obsessive (Murnane admits her major food groups were once Sour Patch Kids and Diet Coke) has gone on to found One Part Plant—a movement aimed toward helping people eat one plant-based meal each day.



Daniel Holzman’s Chopped Vegetable Salad is one of the recipes in the new book One Part Plant

And through One Part Plant: A Simple Guide to Eating Real, One Meal at a Time ($28, Harper Wave), Murnane’s new cookbook, she’s helping home cooks everywhere see the green side. With unfussy recipes, and tips for grocery shopping and eating out—plus an enlightening forward from writer, director and fellow endometriosis sufferer Lena Dunham, and recipes from big-name chefs like Ruth Reichl and Daniel Holzman—Murnane’s main goal is to make eating well approachable. “I am not expecting you to go crazy and become a raw, vegan, gluten-free person for the rest of your life,” she says. “There is zero judgement when you pick up this cookbook.”



Jessica Murnane




CELEB SPOTTING

RUMER WILLIS and Dancing With the Stars professional SHARNA BURGESS danced the night away at The Flamingo Rum Club, which is quickly becoming River North’s latest hot spot (NFL quarterback CAM NEWTON also recently stopped by). Chicago Bulls star DWYANE WADE enjoyed the pescado frito at Ronero. SCOTT DISICK and his children Mason and Penelope hosted the grand opening of Sugar Factory Chicago. The Bachelor star NICK VIALL dined with friends at Siena Tavern. Chicago Med actor NICK GEHLFUSS noshed on a Morning Veggie Wrap at LYFE Kitchen in Streeterville. JENNIE GARTH enjoyed Public House on a recent visit. –Sarah Ryan




YSL Monogram earrings, $445, by Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello at Saint Laurent, 312.202.0166

NAME GAME

ICONIC INITIALS
This season, Saint Laurent endured a changing of the guard, ushering in designer Anthony Vaccarello to helm the Parisian atelier. As with any designer’s premiere collection, setting the stage of what is to come from the house is paramount. Previous designer Hedi Slimane famously dropped the “Yves” in Saint Laurent, while Vaccarello championed its return, hoisting the magnificent initials high above the runway venue and illuminating the Paris night sky. The iconic monogram also served as heel posts for stilettos and embellished some models’ ears. Breaking the trademark in two parts, the “YS” is a cuff worn high on the ear and the “L” adorns the lobe. Tapping into fashion’s current love affair with ’80s logomania, Vaccarello made it clear he’s embracing the brand’s heritage down to the letter. –Jacqueline Zenere


FAB 5

CLANDESTINE COCKTAILING
These stylish (and semi-secret) watering holes all require a keen sense of geography, a taste for adventure and, sometimes, an insider’s invite. –David Zivan

1BIRCH ROAD CELLAR

The two locations of this members only club, in Lincoln Park and Roscoe Village, offer oases for sharing your best stuff with your best friends— its all BYO, with storage onsite. $89 a month per individual, $119 per couple, birchroadcellar.com

2 BORDEL

The brainchild of impresario Daniel Alonso (Disco is just his latest hit), this swanky speakeasy mixes Chicago Prohibition with Parisian glamour (and adds some vaudeville for good measure). bordelchicago.com

3 THE DRAWING ROOM

Perhaps the most elegant and modernist of the new places to cocktail, this gem inside the Arts Club is open only to members. Join up, if only for the Hogsalt cocktail program. artsclubchicago.org

4 THE DRIFTER

An ever-changing cocktail menu (and an ever-changing roster of quirky entertainment) keeps the cool crowd coming back to this boite beneath the legendary Green Door Tavern. thedrifterchicago.com



The Drawing Room at the Arts Club opened in the fall.

5 THE OFFICE

This place, an invitation-only spinoff of the brilliant Aviary (itself sort of the cocktail version of Grant Atchatz’ Next) still offers a behind-alocked- door thrill and excellent drinks. Private parties can book at theaviary.tocktix.com.




Philip Winchester stretches out as a cerebral character in the newest Dick Wolf property.

PLAYER

LEGAL ACTION
By Joel Reese // Photography by Maarten de Boer

“Basically, I have a lot of different cultures floating around inside of me,” says the amiable actor Philip Winchester. “I spent a lot of time on my grandfather’s cattle ranch in Montana, then we’d go to [my mother’s hometown of] London.” Now, the 36-year-old Winchester is set to join Dick Wolf’s new show Chicago Justice as lawyer Peter Stone. “My character is a ball-busting lawyer who believes the law is the law, the truth is the truth and there’s really nothing else out there,” he says. Winchester’s career has been mostly action roles, including his signature part in the Cinemax series Strike Back. Because of that, he was initially hesitant to accept a talk-oriented role in a legal drama. “When I met with Mr. Wolf about the part, I told him, ‘I’ve been jumping out of helicopters and punching people in the face for the last six years, so I don’t really know what to do with this,’” Winchester says. “He told me, ‘Well, if you take this, I’ll need you to punch people with your eyes.’” We’ll be watching.


BEAUTY TECH

Mirror, Mirror

Take note, makeup mavens: Neiman Marcus’ beauty counters are getting a serious upgrade. MemoryMirror—the newest high-tech experiential shopping gadget from Palo Alto, Calif.-based startup MemoMi— makes achieving that fresh-fromthe- makeup-chair finish easier than ever. Beauty ambassadors from Le Metier de Beaute are the first to equip their counters with the smart mirror, which combines HD video with state-of-the-art LED lighting to capture your entire makeup consultation—from face to eyes to cheeks to lips—and translate it into a step-by-step at-home tutorial. Plus, with MemoryMirror’s high-end lighting system, beauty ambassadors can simulate tricky settings like nighttime and office for a no-fail natural look no matter the occasion. 737 N. Michigan Ave., 312.642.5900, neimanmarcus.com –Jessie Sardina




TRENDWATCH

SHOCK TREATMENT
Electrify your wardrobe this spring with a heavy dose of head-turning neon.




BORN-AGAIN BAG

MAKER’S MARKS Each new season ushers in the latest “it” bag. But what happens to the bag of seasons past? With some, the novelty wears, while others carve out coveted closet space as perennial purses. One such bag: Proenza Schouler’ s PS1. This season, Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez injected an added dimension to the beloved bag, with the debut of the PS1+. The signature oblong square shape will still be carried, but there are subtle differences in hardware and stitching from its predecessor. Less nuanced alterations will allow the wearers to customize their bags with detachable straps and charms in a collage of prints, textures and colors seen in the house’s runway collections. The endless combinations of options provides a way to express a unique sense of style without having to say a word. –JZ



Tiny lapis with patchwork strap bag, $1,750, proenzaschouler.com


LIGHTEN UP

TEE TIME
There’s not much more gratifying than finding a tee you love that loves you back. Since its launch in November, women’s T-shirt line 143—the numerical code for “I love you”— has made that match an easier one. The Chicago-based brand, which retails at FELT, Chalk and online, offers a variety of fits and necklines, all made with a special rayon blend that won’t shrink, pill or fade in the dryer. “T-shirts can be anything you want them to be,” says 143 founder and CEO Jenna Saltzman. “We want to show women through our extensive styling that T-shirts can be worn a million different ways—not just with jeans.” The company operates out of a refurbished charcoal factory on Ada Street. “We think it reflects our unique approach to our brand,” says Saltzman. 143tees.com –Nicole Ross



Local brand 143 makes durable, stylish T-shirts for women.

OH, MAMA!
“‘Whistler’s Mother,’” notes Victoria Sancho Lobis, interim chair of the department of prints and drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago, “has been reproduced so many times that you think you know what it looks like. But it has so many levels of potential interpretation.” Plus, adds Sarah Kelly Oehler, interim chair of American painting, “it’s bigger than you think. Much bigger.” On March 4, the co-curators open an installation centered around the iconic painting, which is making just its second visit since 1933. We got some notes from the experts. artic.edu –DZ



“That’s probably a piece of kimono fabric or a wall-hanging,” Oehler says. “He [James McNeill Whistler] was one of the first artists to collect Japanese works of art.”

The print on the wall is Whistler’s own. “It’s a little secret that only the Whistler cognoscenti—major print collectors— would have known,” Oehler says.

“The austerity of her mourning dress,” Lobis says, “ lends itself to part of what he was interested in—a painting with a limited color palette, which lends to its modernity.”

“Part of what seems severe is that she’s fullprofile,” Lobis says. “In its own time, that was not seen as rigid as we see it today. Her position refers somewhat explicitly to classical antiquity.”




HOT SPOT

ALL THAT Scott Stegman, owner of the new Winter’s Jazz Club in Streeterville, named the club after his mother. “She’d put us to bed, make herself a martini, and then the sounds of jazz would float upstairs every night,” he recalls. The club features straight-ahead classic jazz with a focus on vocalists—and on the music itself. Seating is tiered so every guest has a view—plus, the space has a serious sound system. As a result, Stegman says, “the artists love performing here.” Coming up: Yvonne Faddis Stroud trio, March 23, tickets $15, 465 N. McClurg Court, 312.344.1270, wintersjazzclub.com –Marjie Killeen

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Now/2721253/387243/article.html.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here