MANH March 2017 : Page 66

ST Y L E & DESIGN real estate From left: At 180 E. 88th St., developed by DDG, kitchens feature Italian Statuario marble, Gaggenau appliances and natural brass details; vaulted arches frame 360-degree views from the penthouse terrace. 66 MAN H A T T AN M A R C H 2 0 1 7 | M O D E R N L U X U R Y. C O M IMAGES BY MARCH MADE FOR DDG “ The Q train extension up Second Avenue proves convenience is a premium luxury. By Shira Levine TO THE UES! ALL ABOARD t used to be that you could tell a neighborhood was on the uptick by the number of Starbucks,” says Anna Zaro of Extell, the developer behind The Kent at 200 E. 95th St. “Now it’s Drybars. They’re my indicator of how a neighborhood is doing. And there’s now one on the Upper East Side.” That Drybar and a plethora of other retail spaces have recently moved into the traditionally residential-exclusive neighborhood. The reason? What may be Manhattan’s most significant infrastructural change of this century: the Second Avenue subway. The four stations running from 63rd to 96th streets have already revolutionized residential and commercial real estate (and pricing) within an area long considered sleepy, barely known as Yorkville. “There’s value added in housing east of Second Avenue in terms of both resale and new construction,” says Town Residential’s Mady Faber. “The area is no longer a war zone. Because it was, it’s remained lower than the rest of the city. Even if rates go up—which they are, to $1,800 per square foot from $1,300 and $1,500—you’re still getting good value.” So, after a decade of visual and auditory torture, those who stuck out the scaffolding and jackhammers are seeing the fruits. As of early 2017, there are 19 new developments in various stages of progress. “Now I’m getting all these Wall Street guys, who never wanted to go to 89th and Second, in contracts,” says Faber. “The new subway made that connection for them. We’ve got that Park Avenue look and Fifth Avenue feel while by the river, and with park access.” And that connection can get 57th Street-level fancy. Projects like Robert A.M. Stern’s 20 East End Ave., DDG’s 180 E. 88th St., The Charles at 1355 First Ave. and the Lucida at 151 E. 85th St. aim to bring downtown-sleek design, curation out the wazoo and haute amenities to the growing Manhattan family. “We started with the Lucida when there wasn’t this level of retail,” says Extell’s Zaro. “The last 18 months have shown spectacular price growth in the Upper East Side and Yorkville, while other markets have plateaued.” Walking distance from the Lucida (a 20-story glass CookFox-designed condo) is a Whole Foods, Shake Shack, Sephora, Meatball Shop and, indeed, that Drybar—and now, the 86th Street Q train stop. “No one says they don’t want past Third Avenue anymore,” says Corcoran’s Tamir Shemesh, who represents The Clare at 301 E. 61st St. “Now the low-rises are being redeveloped: where there were 15 to 20 units, now there are hundreds.”

Style & Design Real Estate

Shira Levine

ALL ABOARD TO THE UES!

The Q train extension up Second Avenue proves convenience is a premium luxury.

"It used to be that you could tell a neighborhood was on the uptick by the number of Starbucks,” says Anna Zaro of Extell, the developers behind 180 E. 88th St. and the Kent at 200 E. 95th St. “Now it’s Drybars. They’re my indicator of how a neighborhood is doing. And there’s now one on the Upper East Side.”

That Drybar and a plethora of other retail spaces have recently moved into the traditionally residentialexclusive neighborhood. The reason? What may be Manhattan’s most significant infrastructural change of this century: the Second Avenue subway. The four stations running from 63rd to 96th streets have already revolutionized residential and commercial real estate (and pricing) within an area long considered sleepy, barely known as Yorkville. “There’s value added in housing east of Second Avenue in terms of both resale and new construction,” says Town Residential’s Mady Faber. “The area is no longer a war zone. Because it was, it’s remained lower than the rest of the city. Even if rates go up—which they are, to $1,800 per square foot from $1,300 and $1,500—you’re still getting good value.”

So, after a decade of visual and auditory torture, those who stuck out the scafflolding and jackhammers are seeing the fruits. As of early 2017, there are 19 new developments in various stages of progress. “Now I’m getting all these Wall Street guys, who never wanted to go to 89th and Second, in contracts,” says Faber. “The new subway made that connection for them. We’ve got that Park Avenue look and Fifth Avenue feel while by the river, and with park access.”

And that connection can get 57th Streetlevel fancy. Projects like Robert A.M. Stern’s 20 East End Ave., The Charles at 1355 First Ave. And the Lucida at 151 E. 85th St. aim to bring downtown-sleek design, curation out the wazoo and haute amenities to the growing Manhattan family. “We started with the Lucida when there wasn’t this level of retail,” says Extell’s Zaro. “The last 18 months have shown spectacular price growth in the Upper East Side and Yorkville, while other markets have plateaued.”

Walking distance from the Lucida (a 20-story glass CookFox-designed condo) is a Whole Foods, Shake Shack, Sephora, Meatball Shop and, indeed, that Drybar—and now, the 86th Street Q train stop. “No one says they don’t want past third Avenue anymore,” says Corcoran’s Tamir Shemesh, who represents the Clare at 301 E. 61st St. “Now the low-rises are being redeveloped: where there were 15 to 20 units, now there are hundreds.”

Uptown Glory

Take a peak inside these new luxury developments, all within a few blocks’ walk of the new Second Avenue Q train. –SL

THE KENT

LOCATION 200 E. 95th St. at Third Avenue

DISTANCE FROM Q One avenue west from 96th Street stop

DETAILS The 30-story, 83-unit art deco condo is designed by Beyer Blinder Belle and developed by Extell, offering twobedroom homes that start at $2.45 million. With family in mind, amenities include an indoor heated swimming pool, state-ofthe- art gym and Camp Kent, where residents will find a treehouse, a music lounge designed by Lenny Kravitz and, in the name of job creation (plus convenience!), a stroller valet. Thekentnyc.com

CITIZEN360

LOCATION 360 E. 89th St. at First Avenue

DISTANCE FROM Q Three blocks and half an avenue from 86th Street stop

DETAILS Designed by the hip ShoP architects, the 34-story, 84-unit, design-forward building features ShoP’s signature undulating facade and some seriously suburban comforts in the quintessentially Yorkville location. There’s a fitness center and wellness lounge, a playroom and art studio, an entertainment suite and a screening room. The four-bedroom, 5 ½-bath penthouse recently sold in combination with the unit below it for $21 million; two-bedroom, twobathroom apartments start at $2.14 million. Citizen360.com

THE CLARE

LOCATION 301 E. 61st St. at Second Avenue

DISTANCE FROM Q Two blocks and one avenue from the 63rd Street stop

DETAILS This 19-story, 30-unit limestone and glass tower designed by Manuel Glas aspires to house a wide-ranging demographic with offerings from studios to a four-bedroom triplex penthouse. Articulating the building’s amenity spaces as showpieces, the fitness center, wellness studio, indoor and outdoor communal lounge, kitchen and entertainment spaces are decidedly north. Instead of being located at a subterranean level, they’re perched spaciously on the 13th floor to allow for height— 12 feet to be exact—and the embrace of those Central Park and Queensboro Bridge views. Theclarenyc.com

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Style+%26+Design+Real+Estate/2726098/388683/article.html.

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