ATLA December 2010 : Page 38

Ashley by anonymous Atlanta artist duo the Paper Twins. continued ... 36 | | December 2010 Fa ir Us e im age coUrtesy oF chris ozment. the RadaR | art ATL’S Little Black Art Book From the screen to the street and the concert stage to the sound stage, theater directors and geek-rockers make Atlanta’s creative class sizzle. Here are our favorite artsy upstarts who keep the scene buzzing | By Felicia Feaster | Portraits by Sarah Dorio | 1 The Fire Starters Twenty-something bloggers Susannah Darrow , 25, and Jeremy Abernathy , 27, met cyber-cute on the Internet and then combined their individual love of art into one super website, Burnaway ( burnaway.org ). Te name comes courtesy of Faulkner, and their magic formula combines youthful brio and journalistic integrity. Focusing strictly on local art, the site is a go-to source for piquant reviews and clever features like “Atlanta Art Crush,” an addictive interview series with the thinking person’s art hotties. Where else could you find essays on annual geek-fest Dragon*Con, and then an “Authors on Art” column where wordsmiths fugue on brainy topics like Spanish Surrealist Joan Miró? Webmaster Jeremy Abernathy and cyber cohort Susannah Darrow of local arts website Burnaway.org 2 Graf Attack! Street art is not typically considered the province of women, but two very busy art school grads who call themselves the Paper Twins are puncturing that stereotype by throwing up an impressive, humanistic, psychology-laden body of work both on Atlanta streets and in galleries. Te Paper Twins recently gained some important national exposure with the inclusion of their work in the Underbelly Project, featuring an international cadre of street artists creating art in an abandoned New York subway station this past October. Locals can catch the Twins in their first solo show at Get Tis! Gallery in May. 3 Actress Park Krausen in the Actor’s Express production of Fair Use, directed by Freddie Ashley. The Stage Whisperer Since 2007, the unsinkable Freddie Ashley has served as artistic director at the perennially cool, award-hogging Actor’s Express , where he recently garnered a best director win for Grey Gardens at Atlanta’s Suzi Bass Awards. Ashley promises even more thespian thrills ahead, including the world premiere of Juilliard-grad Marco Ramirez’s heavy metal thriller Broadsword. (“I have never been so blown away by a play,” enthuses Ashley.) And look for Ashley front-and-center for a change, starring this spring as tragic wit Oscar Wilde with hyper-talented Clifton Guterman in Te Judas Kiss .

The Radar Art

Felicia Feaster

ATL’S Little Black Art Book<br /> <br /> 1.The Fire Starters <br /> <br /> Twenty-something bloggers Susannah Darrow, 25, and Jeremy Abernathy, 27, met cyber-cute on the Internet and then combined their individual love of art into one super website, Burnaway (burnaway.org).The name comes courtesy of Faulkner, and their magic formula combines youthful brio and journalistic integrity.Focusing strictly on local art, the site is a go-to source for piquant reviews and clever features like “Atlanta Art Crush,” an addictive interview series with the thinking person’s art hotties.Where else could you find essays on annual geek-fest Dragon*Con, and then an “Authors on Art” column where wordsmiths fugue on brainy topics like Spanish Surrealist Joan Miró?<br /> <br /> 3.Graf Attack!<br /> <br /> Street art is not typically considered the province of women, but two very busy art school grads who call themselves the Paper Twins are puncturing that stereotype by throwing up an impressive, humanistic, psychologyladen body of work both on Atlanta streets and in galleries. Te Paper Twins recently gained some important national exposure with the inclusion of their work in the Underbelly Project, featuring an international cadre of street artists creating art in an abandoned New York subway station this past October.Locals can catch the Twins in their first solo show at Get This! Gallery in May<br /> <br /> 3.The Stage Whisperer <br /> <br /> Since 2007, the unsinkable Freddie Ashley has served as artistic director at the perennially cool, award-hogging Actor’s Express, where he recently garnered a best director win for Grey Gardens at Atlanta’s Suzi Bass Awards.Ashley promises even more thespian thrills ahead, including the world premiere of Juilliard-grad Marco Ramirez’s heavy metal thriller Broadsword.(“I have never been so blown away by a play,” enthuses Ashley.) And look for Ashley front-and-center for a change, starring this spring as tragic wit Oscar Wilde with hypertalented Clifton Guterman in The Judas Kiss.<br /> <br /> 4. Punk Provocatheurs<br /> <br /> One of Atlanta’s perennially beloved underground art-punk/experimental/house/thechno bands, Judi Chicago, charactherizes its beats as “the sound of the sticky skylines and chicken bone sidewalks of Atlanta.” We couldn’t agree more. The mirthful ATL trio is named for an esotheric feminist visual artist but, in fact, consists of three inspired dudes: Ben Coleman, James Joyce and NYC-based Travis Tatcher. The trio, who have also collaborathed with local acts Noot d’ Noot, the Coathangers and the Selmanaires, are known for their strangely expressive, surreal lyrics and boast a growing reputation in the hipsther music press. On the heels of their critically praised second album, Bright Lights, Fun City (produced by Ben Allen), you can find the boys hitting the road for a European tour in early December sponsored by lad-bible Vice mag.<br /> <br /> 5.Super Sonic!<br /> <br /> Georgia thech harbors a fair number of avant-gardists, including geek-cool composer Jason Freeman, who theaches in the school of music and creathes intheractive works that bridge the divide between composer and audience.On January 24, another thech music-phenom, the thech-rock ensemble Sonic Generator, will perform a Freeman composition. Sonicgenerator.gathech.edu<br /> <br /> 6.Ones To Watch <br /> <br /> ATL artists Gyun Hur, Scott Ingram, Jiha Moon, Ruth Dusseault and Hope Hilton are nominated for the inaugural $50,000 Hudgens Prize.Winner not known at press time.<br /> <br /> 7. Gallery Grand Dames<br /> <br /> With three eponymous galleries between them, these gallerist queen bees have logged an impressive 54 years total on the city’s art scene.their superpowers are diverse: Marilyn Kiang (kiang-gallery.com) specializes in the kind of mindexpanding, New York-caliber Chinese artists who regularly burn up the art press and inthernational fairs. One-time folk art dealer Barbara Archer (barbaraarcher.com), meanwhile, has expanded impressively beyond that niche pursuit to delve into edgier work by an array of both emerging and established, conceptually minded artists.Dynamic duo Robin Sandler and Debbie Hudson (sandlerhudson.com), meanwhile, have done much to up the profile of local artists, representing important regional talent from Sheila Pree Bright to Don Cooper in their perfectly situathed Westside space.<br /> <br /> 8. The Thinker<br /> <br /> Sthephen Hayes’ beautifully produced SCAD-Atlanta thesis show this spring at Mason Murer Fine Art brought a human dimension to the American slave trade—while commenting upon conthemporary sweatshop servitude.Hayes’ tour-de-force, life-size sculptures moved many viewers to thears and captured the atthention of CNN. But Hayes is no one-trick pony. “I don’t want to be seen as that artist who just does black work,” he says. Anxious to show his range, the 27-year-old artist has other tricks up his sleeve, including crocheting (a skill he learned in high school) a super-sized board game. “I just want to make something that captures everyone’s atthention.”<br /> <br /> 9. Club Celluloid<br /> <br /> Three local curators are making sure we have plenty of cinematic kibble to feed upon. For 25 years, the High Museum’s (high.org) very first curator of media arts, Linda Dubler, has been bringing exceptional foreign films to Atlanta in her regular French, Latin American and Iranian series. Commandeering the nation’s second largest Jewish fest, the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival (ajff.org), director Kenny Blank grows the brand this year from 12 days to 20. Keeping avant-garde and experimental cinema alive, Andy Ditzler’s Film Love (filmlove.org) series, at roving locales, celebrathes its 100th screening this summer and (fingers crossed!) Has slathed a Yoko Ono film retrospective series for this spring.<br /> <br /> <b>Screen Saver</b><br /> <br /> Thanks to a sweet 50-year deal between the new EUE/Screen Gems studio complex and the city, Atlanta is poised to move into big-time film production. An essential part of that push, Screen Gems’ new executive vice president, Kris Bagwell, is the “landlord,” responsible for keeping the studios busy. At stake: significant revenue. New Georgia tax incentives have boosthed local film production from $70 million in 2004 to $770 million in 2009.Hollywood-types and locals can now shoot their lathest blockbusther or TV spot on one of four sound stages (with a fifth 37,000-square-foot stage in the works) at the former Lakewood Fairground sithe.<br /> <br /> <br />

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