CHSO September 2011 : Page 164

Home Hot List – fall 2011– Let’s face it: Th e fi rst green revolution (Solar panels! Better light bulbs! Beige-y furniture!) was a little uninspired. But green is going through a renaissance, ushering in a new era of eco-chicness. Herewith... the Chicago people, places and products that are taking earth-friendly living into the future. | By Jessica Girdwain, Korey Huyler & Matt Lee | Portraits by Matthew Gilson | Eco 2.0 innovative offering talking points “Th e cabinets were manufactured using an oak veneer on FSC certifi ed plywood, yielding hundreds more doors and drawers from a single tree.” —DAVID MCNULTY, WHO DESIGNED THE CABINETS IN THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY’S “SMART” HOME new store Off the Wall Chicago design guru Maya Romanoff , the largest manufacturer of handcrafted wallcoverings in the country, has always been a leader in the creation of good-for-the-planet items. In fact, almost every product listing on his site includes info about eco materials and LEED certification. To celebrate more than 40 years in the business and his new Mart showroom, Romanoff recently introduced five new collections. Our favorite is the Flex Mother of Pearl Aphrodite wall shown above. It’s made with rapidly renewable materials, installs with low-VOC adhesive and is metal-and formaldehyde-free. Even better? Th e minimum amount of shell is used to produce maximum eff ect, making these tiles an ecologically responsible alternative to bulkier walls. mayaromanoff .com 164 | Home Style Th e phrase “sustainably sourced” doesn’t exactly conjure up images of gallery-worthy home décor, but Andersonville’s new shop Haymaker squashes that expectation. Its pieces —ra nging from whimsica l home accessories to heirloom-quality furniture—are not only gorgeous, but are also handcrafted by independent Midwest artisans, giving you another reason to support this shop. “Designers have enough outlets in New York and Los Angeles, and too often talented Chicagoans head to either coast,” says owner Arrin Williams. “Th is store is meant to keep the creation here in Chicago.” Look out for designs from Modern Industry Design, New Breed Furniture Network and Greta de Parry. haymakershop.com | September 2011 MAYA ROMANOFF PHOTO BY GEORGE LAMBROS/LAMBROS PHOTOGRAPHY, INC.; HAYMAKER PHOTO BY SARA POOLEY

Eco 2 0

Jessica Girdwain, Korey Huyler & Matt Lee

Let’s face it: The first green revolution (Solar panels! Better light bulbs! Beige-y furniture!) Was a little uninspired. But green is going through a renaissance, ushering in a new era of eco-chicness. Herewith... the Chicago people, places and products that are taking earth-friendly living into the future.

Innovative Offering

Off The Wall

Chicago design guru Maya Romanoff, the largest manufacturer of handcrafted wallcoverings in the country, has always been a leader in the creation of good-for-theplanet items. In fact, almost every product listing on his site includes info about eco materials and LEED certification. To celebrate more than 40 years in the business and his new Mart showroom, Romanoff recently introduced five new collections. Our favorite is the Flex Mother of Pearl Aphrodite wall shown above. It’s made with rapidly renewable materials, installs with low-VOC adhesive and is metal- and formaldehyde-free. Even better? The minimum amount of shell is used to produce maximum effect, making these tiles an ecologically responsible alternative to bulkier walls. Mayaromanoff.com

Talking Points

"Th e cabinets were manufactured using an oak veneer on FSC certified plywood, yielding hundreds more doors and drawers from a single tree."

—DAVID MCNULTY, WHO DESIGNED THE CABINETS IN THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY’S “SMART” HOME

New Store

Home Style

The phrase “sustainably sourced” doesn’t exactly conjure up images of gallery-worthy home décor, but Andersonville’s new shop Haymaker squashes that expect ation. Its pieces—ranging from whimsical home accessories to heirloom-quality furniture—are not only gorgeous, but are also handcrafted by independent Midwest artisans, giving you another reason to support this shop. “Designers have enough outlets in New York and Los Angeles, and too often talented Chicagoans head to either coast,” says owner Arrin Williams. “This store is meant to keep the creation here in Chicago.” Look out for designs from Modern Industry Design, New Breed Furniture Network and Greta de Parry.Haymakershop.com

Designer To Watch

Mix Master

Ann Kendall of Covet Studio in Glencoe knows good green living. Case in point: this space she’s artfully designed. It’s an effortless example of everything that’s cool about the new iteration of ecoliving. Sure, there are sustainable elements, like low-VOC paint, florescent bulbs and renewable cork floors. But beyond that, Kendall packs the space with vintage and antique elements. “I don’t think a lot of people think of vintage pieces as green, but they are. It’s all about reusing and repurposing something that’s existing,” she says. Though the couch is her own design, the rare vintage Laurel Lamps are made from carved, raised oak and the white stools underneath the table are featherweight resin pod stools that can be used both indoors and out. And let’s not forget the bold collection of wall prints, taken from an 1847 edition of an antique astrology book. Eco sure isn’t textbook anymore. Covetstudio.com

Refurbish Star

Golden Opportunities

When Douglas Van Tress and Chauwarin Tuntisak founded The Golden Triangle 22 years ago, being at the forefront of the green movement wasn’t necessarily part of the plan. “I first loved antiques for the aesthetics and the cultural history they embodied,” says Van Tress. “But later I came to appreciate their green properties— partly due to the feedback I got from my customers.” The Golden Triangle is now one of the largest dealers in Chicago of restored and repurposed pieces of furniture, from a gorgeous 19th-century Pakistani townhome façade reconcepted as a bookshelf, to an ancient Thai teak tree stump turned into a one-of-a-kind table. “We are saving the wood, but more importantly the human labor and intelligence embedded in that old wood,” says Van Tress, motioning to a 200-year-old Chinese chair. “Why not keep the things you work hard for for the rest of your life? People are coming around to that.”

Away From Home

Living Large

For a dose of fresh air, people staying at the Embassy Suites Downtown Lakefront on Columbus Drive need only step out of their rooms and inhale deeply. That’s because the hotel erected an enormous (and totally gorgeous) 720-square-foot living green wall in its Sky Lobby this past summer. Th e vertical garden is packed with 3,840 plants, ranging from rabbit foot fern to colorful rex begonias and everything in between. “It’s like creating a living piece of art,” says Denise Eichmann, the designer and installing contractor who works for Ambius, a company that specializes in interior landscaping solutions. “The plants are the artist’s color palette.” According to Eichmann, the amount of clean oxygen the plants in the wall circulate is equivalent to 16 14-foot -tall trees. Just say “aaaah.” embassysuites.com

Talking Points

“The green movement is transforming to focus on healthy design, which considers both the environment and indoor air quality by providing solutions to limit exposure to harmful toxins.”

- Interior Designer Susan Fredman

Products We Love

Chicago’s Finest

Three innovative local showrooms sell some of the most forward-thinking eco- friendly products we've seen in years. Some highlights? Artemide (artemide.com) specializes in contemporary decorative and architectural lighting, and sells the Copernico suspension light shown above, while Hydrology (hydrology.com) off ers this gorgeous Acquapura shower wall; the company specializes in pure bath aesthetics that are respectful to the environment and are created with mindful materials. And sustainable materials are the focus of San Juan Ventures (sanju anventures.com), an FSC certified company specializing in exquisite slabs, fl ooring, wall paneling, sculpture and furniture sourced from reclaimed, abandoned or salvaged wood materials from Indonesia.

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Eco+2+0/824860/80429/article.html.

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