ANGE October 2011 : Page 64

64 | Angeleno | October 2011 the RADAR | design Popping Up With a Cause Charity finds a home in interior designer Carrie Livingston’s latest project in a Century City penthouse loft. | By Alexandria Abramian-Mott | | Photography by Dale Berman | Carrie Livingston might epitomize the notion of a jet-setting decorator, racking up six-figure frequent flyer miles while hopping from project to project. But after a summer of shuttling between London, Moscow, Provence and Sardinia, Livingston is staying put in L.A. for an entire month this fall—a recent record for the Des Moines, Iowa-born interior decorator. The reason? A pop-up art and design gallery that she’s created within a Century City penthouse loft (1520 S. Beverly Glen Blvd., PH 603, L.A.). Inside the two-bedroom apartment Livingston has curated a collection of some LIVINGSTON, WE PRESUME of her favorite artists, along with Clockwise from top left: designer Carrie vintage furniture and lighting, Interior Livingston in the pop-up her own line of accessories and gallery with Jason Alper’s furniture, and even textiles and fiberglass sculpture; Harry chrome Roller Stop; books that she’s collected while Allen’s Sarah Baley’s digital art circling the globe. hangs on the dining area “Ev e r y t h i n g h e re i s wall near a teak and lacquer designed by something that feels really table Livingston; a Takashi special and unique to me,” says Murakami sculpture; a Livingston. “And everything casually styled bookshelf the gallery’s here, I mean just about every supports lived-in look. last thing, will be for sale.” Walk from room to room and you get an immediate sense of Livingston’s big-impact, slightly offbeat aesthetic. It’s a specific brand of high-design daring that’s made her a sought-after source for clients like Ralph Lauren, Normandie Keith and Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich, for whom she has worked on multiple mega-sized projects around the world. Here in Century City, however, the scale is much smaller at just 1,600 square feet. But the meaning of the exhibit, called Blurred Lines , may have more significance to the designer than her other work. All proceeds from the gallery will go to UCLA’s Early Childhood Partial Hospitalization Program, a renowned day treatment facility for children with autism and developmental disabilities that Livingston discovered when her own son was diagnosed with autism. “It was my goal to get him the best help available and now he’s doing great,” says Livingston of her 5-year-old son, Graham. “I see this as a chance to help support other families who have children with autism.” The appointment-only gallery, which will be open from mid-October through mid-November, will give visitors an eyeful not just of some of Livingston’s favorite artists (including photographers like New York-based Sarah Baley, Paris-based Rey Gost and L.A.’s Mark Hanauer), but will also show how she incorporates their work in a way that keeps spaces feeling accessible and playful instead of cold and sterile. Take a pair of enormous sunglasses by Jason Alper that kick back in the dining/ living area next to low-slung Lucite seat of Livingston’s design with a striking piece of digital wall art by Gost in the background. Put it all together and you’ve got a look that’s seriously cool for an awesome cause. A

The Radar Design

Alexandria Abramian-Mott

Popping Up With a Cause<br /> <br /> Charity finds a home in interior designer Carrie Livingston’s latest project in a Century City penthouse loft.<br /> <br /> Carrie Livingston might epitomize the notion of a jet-setting decorator, racking up six-figure frequent flyer miles while hopping from project to project. But after a summer of shuttling between London, Moscow, Provence and Sardinia, Livingston is staying put in L. A. for an entire month this fall—a recent record for the Des Moines, Iowa-born interior decorator. The reason? A pop-up art and design gallery that she’s created within a Century City penthouse loft (1520 S. Beverly Glen Blvd., PH 603, L.A.). Inside the twobedroom apartment Livingston has curated a collection of some of her favorite artists, along with vintage furniture and lighting, her own line of accessories and furniture, and even textiles and books that she’s collected while circling the globe.<br /> <br /> “Everything here is something that feels really special and unique to me,” says Livingston. “And everything here, I mean just about every last thing, will be for sale.” Walk from room to room and you get an immediate sense of Livingston’s bigimpact, slightly offbeat aesthetic. It’s a specific brand of high-design daring that’s made her a sought-after source for clients like Ralph Lauren, Normandie Keith and Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich, for whom she has worked on multiple mega-sized projects around the world.<br /> <br /> Here in Century City, however, the scale is much smaller at just 1,600 square feet. But the meaning of the exhibit, called Blurred Lines, may have more significance to the designer than her other work. All proceeds from the gallery will go to UCLA’s Early Childhood Partial Hospitalization Program, a LIVINGSTON, WE PRESUME Clockwise from top left: Interior designer Carrie Livingston in the pop-up gallery with Jason Alper’s fiberglass sculpture; Harry Allen’s chrome Roller Stop; Sarah Baley’s digital art hangs on the dining area wall near a teak and lacquer table designed by Livingston; a Takashi Murakami sculpture; a casually styled bookshelf supports the gallery’s lived-in look. Renowned day treatment facility for children with autism and developmental disabilities that Livingston discovered when her own son was diagnosed with autism. “It was my goal to get him the best help available and now he’s doing great,” says Livingston of her 5-year-old son, Graham. “I see this as a chance to help support other families who have children with autism.”<br /> <br /> The appointment-only gallery, which will be open from mid-October through mid-November, will give visitors an eyeful not just of some of Livingston’s favorite artists (including photographers like New York-based Sarah Baley, Paris-based Rey Gost and L.A.’s Mark Hanauer), but will also show how she incorporates their work in a way that keeps spaces feeling accessible and playful instead of cold and sterile. Take a pair of enormous sunglasses by Jason Alper that kick back in the dining/ living area next to low-slung Lucite seat of Livingston’s design with a striking piece of digital wall art by Gost in the background. Put it all together and you’ve got a look that’s seriously cool for an awesome cause.

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