Interiors Chicago October 2011 : Page 144

INTERIOR MONOLOGUE 144 | Pedal Pusher Local furniture designer Seth Deysach gives the humble bike a solid-walnut makeover of his own design—and it’s ready to cruise right on to the superhighway. By Meghan McEwen | Photography by Saverio Trulia After sitting in his woodshop resting against a wall—“just looking pretty”—for a couple years, Seth Deysach’s one-speed, walnut bike is going into small-batch production this fall. And he credits the Internet for its new lease on life. Photos of the bike, which Deysach created for an Object Society exhibit last year, cropped up on a Japanese blog over the summer and became an overnight on-line sensation. ese days, the cabinetmaker-by-day gets at least ve phone calls a week about the bike. “I was trying to show o a little bit. ‘You’re going to make a chair? I’m going to make a [swear word] bicycle.’ I knew I could pull it o . I’m the most quali ed person to do this because I come from both worlds,” says the designer, who worked at specialty bike shops like Turin in Evanston for nearly 15 years before opening up Lagomorph Design 10 years ago. “I started thinking about all the things I could do with the frame of a bike,” he says. “Why isn’t it turned like a bedpost? Why isn’t it treated like furniture?” So Deysach started applying the tricks of his trade—hand-carving, scalloping and very strong bridle joints—to the fork and stem of a frame (chains, hubs, bearings, not included), using his favorite wood (“Walnut is beautiful, versatile and a pleasure to work with,” says Deysach). “I put this together like a piece of heirloom furniture,” notes the designer, who insists that, wow-factor and design cred aside, the most important point is that it’s a good, safe ride. “ at’s pretty essential.” 4200 W. Diversey Ave., 773.218.7956, lagomorphdesign.com BE SPOKES Seth Deysach at a gas station on Diversey Avenue near his studio, Dock 6 DEYSACH’S HOTS Leather, warm lobster rolls, bananas, bronze, Lenny and Squiggy, Breaking Bad , at les DEYSACH’S NOTS Feathers, hot pockets, bandanas, brass, e Fonz, break dancing, ash drives | Fall 2011

Interior Monologue

Meghan Mcewen

Pedal Pusher<br /> <br /> Local furniture designer Seth Deysach gives the humble bike a solidwalnut makeover of his own design—and it’s ready to cruise right on to the superhighway.<br /> <br /> After sitting in his woodshop resting against a wall-"just looking pretty"-for a couple years, Seth Deysach's one-speed, walnut bike is going into smallbatch production this fall. And he credits the Internet for its new lease on life. Photos of the bike, which Deysach created for an Object Society exhibit last year, cropped up on a Japanese blog over the summer and became an overnight on-line sensation. These days, the cabinetmaker-by-day gets at least five phone calls a week about the bike.<br /> <br /> "I was trying to show off a little bit. 'You're going to make a chair? I'm going to make a [swear word] bicycle.' I knew I could pull it off . I'm the most qualified person to do this because I come from both worlds," says the designer, who worked at specialty bike shops like Turin in Evanston for nearly 15 years before opening up Lagomorph Design 10 years ago. "I started thinking about all the things I could do with the frame of a bike," he says. "Why isn't it turned like a bedpost? Why isn't it treated like furniture?" So Deysach started applying the tricks of his trade-hand-carving, scalloping and very strong bridle joints-to the fork and stem of a frame (chains, hubs, bearings, not included), using his favorite wood ("Walnut is beautiful, versatile and a pleasure to work with," says Deysach). "I put this together like a piece of heirloom furniture," notes the designer, who insists that, wow-factor and design cred aside, the most important point is that it's a good, safe ride. "That's pretty essential.

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