WASH December 2011 : Page 140

Yang’s pint-sized restaurant has been filmed for MTV, as well as the Cooking Channel’s Unique Eats . A hip beat pervades the restaurant, luring rock groups like Cibo Matto and Animal Collective —a member of which is a partner in Toki—as well as U Street Music Hall owner Jesse Tittsworth. Toki’s recent hosting of New York’s BaoHaus restaurant in a pop-up style takeover is a sign of its standing among East Coast bon vivants. Nearby, Sheldon Robinson and Miles Gray have crafted a gathering place for artists and actors at Jerome Bailey’s Smith Commons (1245 H St. NE, smithcommonsdc. com). The hot spot’s décor takes inspiration from early-20th-century metalwork factories. Today, Washington Project for the Arts often takes over the third-floor lounge to strategize. The cast and crew of the Atlas Performing Arts Center frequently descends after shows, supping and sipping from the list of 60 craft beers, while lounging in stately houndstooth armchairs. Fans often gather here for autographs long after the ovations are over. 140 | | December 2011 photography of smith commons anD lost society by greg powers; photography of toki unDergrounD by Dakota fine food drink | dish hives with buzz Clockwise from top left: smith Commons’ sheldon Robinson and Miles Gray have created a hip hideaway for DC creatives on h street. the restaurant’s neighbor, toki underground, makes space for rockers, while 14th street’s Lost society sets a place for DJs. Salon Style The city’s artists, actors, DJs and musicians do their best thinking on the town. | By Lauren Sloat | Hill staffers have long held forth at happy-hour haunts, and lobbyists are known for their steak spots. Now DC’s creative class has set down roots, too, turning choice epicurean epicenters in the Atlas District and Logan Circle into modern-day salons for sharing arts and ideas. This winter’s addition of a second-floor space will make the Hemingway-themed Bar Pilar (1833 14th St. NW, barpilar. com) an even bigger draw for the food industry folk who settle here after hours to compare tips for purveyors, ingredients and even recipes. The expansion will add another full bar and at least eight more tables, at which to exchange menu ideas and innovate new cocktails. Already a stop for the visual-arts crew that frequents Pilar’s sister establishment, Café Saint-Ex (1847 14th St. NW, saint-ex.com), the upstairs art studio and framing business by Gina Miele skipped across the street, making way for Pilar’s upward expansion. The restaurateurs certainly showed their appreciation as a collection of both restaurants’ management members invested in Arts@1830, Miele’s new gallery. The same crew sponsors the Mid City Artists neighborhood group, including its biannual open studio tour, which is quickly making the restaurants incubators for both arts and appetites. The loungey Lost Society (2001 14th St. NW, lostsociety-dc. com), a self-proclaimed boutique steakhouse, evokes a steam-punk vibe, complete with tongue-in-cheek chic, Victorian-inspired wallpaper. With its velvet couches and discrete lighting, the restaurant has attracted impressive regulars—a leading lineup of DJs and a steady stream of celebrities—who convene and make new music in the retro-inspired booths. DJs such as Chris Burns, Gavin Holland, Adrian Loving, Stereo Faith and Jahsonic have spun in the upstairs lounge and on the prime roof deck, leading to new collaborations in the DC scene. For musicians who prefer closer quarters for their action, the graffiti-decked walls, skateboard art and thumping soundtrack set the tone at the Atlas District’s months-old ramen joint, Toki Underground (1234 H St. NE, tokiunderground. com). Erik Bruner-

Food Drink Dish

Lauren Sloat

Salon Style

The city’s artists, actors, Djs and musicians do their best thinking on the town.

Hill staffers have long held forth at happy-hour haunts, and lobbyists are known for their steak spots. Now DC’s creative class has set down roots, too, turning choice epicurean epicenters in the Atlas District and Logan Circle into modern-day salons for sharing arts and ideas.

This winter’s addition of a second-floor space will make the Hemingway-themed Bar Pilar (1833 14th St. NW, barpilar. Com) an even bigger draw for the food industry folk who settle here after hours to compare tips for purveyors, ingredients and even recipes. The expansion will add another full bar and at least eight more tables, at which to exchange menu ideas and innovate new cocktails. Already a stop for the visual-arts crew that frequents Pilar’s sister establishment, Café Saint-Ex (1847 14th St. NW, saint-ex.com), the upstairs art studio and framing business by Gina Miele skipped across the street, making way for Pilar’s upward expansion. The restaurateurs certainly showed their appreciation as a collection of both restaurants’ management members invested in Arts@1830, Miele’s new gallery. The same crew sponsors the Mid City Artists neighborhood group, including its biannual open studio tour, which is quickly making the restaurants incubators for both arts and appetites.

The loungey Lost Society (2001 14th St. NW, lostsociety-dc. Com), a self-proclaimed boutique steakhouse, evokes a steam-punk vibe, complete with tongue-in-cheek chic, Victorian-inspired wallpaper. With its velvet couches and discrete lighting, the restaurant has attracted impressive regulars—a leading lineup of Djs and a steady stream of celebrities—who convene and make new music in the retroinspired booths. Djs such as Chris Burns, Gavin Holland, Adrian Loving, Stereo Faith and Jahsonic have spun in the upstairs lounge and on the prime roof deck, leading to new collaborations in the DC scene.

For musicians who prefer closer quarters for their action, the graffiti-decked walls, skateboard art and thumping soundtrack set the tone at the Atlas District’s months-old ramen joint, Toki Underground (1234 H St. NE, tokiunderground. Com). Erik Bruner- Yang’s pint-sized restaurant has been filmed for MTV, as well as the Cooking Channel’s Unique Eats. A hip beat pervades the restaurant, luring rock groups like Cibo Matto and Animal Collective —a member of which is a partner in Toki—as well as U Street Music Hall owner Jesse Tittsworth. Toki’s recent hosting of New York’s BaoHaus restaurant in a pop-up style takeover is a sign of its standing among East Coast bon vivants.

Nearby, Sheldon Robinson and Miles Gray have crafted a gathering place for artists and actors at Jerome Bailey’s Smith Commons (1245 H St. NE, smithcommonsdc. Com). The hot spot’s décor takes inspiration from early-20th-century metalwork factories. Today, Washington Project for the Arts often takes over the third-floor lounge to strategize. The cast and crew of the Atlas Performing Arts Center frequently descends after shows, supping and sipping from the list of 60 craft beers, while lounging in stately houndstooth armchairs. Fans often gather here for autographs long after the ovations are over.

Read the full article at http://digital.modernluxury.com/article/Food+Drink+Dish/903693/90933/article.html.

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