SANF January, 2012 : Page 32

the talk BAy AreA COunterintuitiOn Quiz 1. according to a study by the Daily Beast , this year san francisco took first place as the city in the u.s. with the most a. charitable giving. b. Occupy protests. c. vanity. d. restaurants per capita. e. fleece-wearing bicyclists. 2. The payroll records of some recently retired police officers were released this past year. Take a wild guess at how much ex–police chief Heather fong received in compensation when she retired. a. less than $250,000. b. less than $300,000. c. More than $400,000. d. More than $500,000. 3. which bay area city has the biggest wealth gap—or, rather, chasm? a. Berkeley, the storied epicenter of lefty politics. b. Marin, where the old hippies have been edged out by new wealth. c. Menlo Park, always rich, now even richer. d. Oakland, the latest gentrification center. e. San francisco, of course! 4. speed dating has always been popular in san francisco. but this year the city put a special spin on it by adding which of the following new dimensions? a. eating: Participants share one favorite recipe and then move on. b. reading: in an event hosted by the S.f. Public library, romance seekers bring and share their favorite books, hoping to bond based on a love of literature. c. kissing: Participants skip the formalities and kiss for two minutes, then decide whom they’d like to see again based on the experience. d. Shutting up: Based on the idea that 95 percent of communication is nonverbal, prospective daters sit opposite each other without speaking for seven minutes. 5. even as we prayed that this boom wouldn’t go the way of the last, we bid farewell to an en dur ing symbol of the dot-com glory days. what was it? a. Sushi at at&t Park. b. the yahoo! billboard on i-80. c. free wireless in Starbucks. d. the sake cocktails at Sushi Groove South. circle only one answer per iteM 2011 Our year of living paradoxically Remember when San Francisco buzzed with innovation, invention, and the fear that we were losing our character to an invasion of baby-faced technocrats? When rents spiraled out of control, a new fusion restaurant opened every seven minutes, and instant moguls bought Potrero Hill flats with startup cash? Yes, we’re talking about 2011. as the country faced the worst econ-omy since the great depression, san francisco partied like it was 1999 , with a new tech boom that was bringing in yet another generation of sharp twenty-somethings with big ideas and bigger wallets. On the other hand, if you weren’t an entrepreneur, a program-mer, or a recently retired city employee (see question no. 2), you probably spent the year sucking it up with the rest of us: cursing Muni, losing the public school lottery, and wondering if it was time to move back in with your parents. Here, test your knowledge of this whiplash-inducing year. n Sheerly Avni 6. in-state college tuition rates rose by an average of 17.6 percent. Luckily, san francisco angel investor Peter Thiel has created a fellowship that will offer grants of $100,000 each to students under age 20 who are willing to a. major in computer science and forgo the fellowship if they can’t maintain an a+ average for four years. b. sign up for three years of public service following graduation. c. become fluent in chinese and arabic. d. use the $100k on their own projects instead of attending college. 7. The san francisco metro area now has the highest rents in the state of california. True or faLse ? city life 8. san francisco is the best-educated city in california. True or faLse ? bonus round Match the Bay area institution to the 2011 achieveMent (duBious or otherwise) 9. burning Man 10. goLden gaTe Park 11. foLsoM sTreeT fair 12. cHez Panisse a. celebrated its 40th anniversary with a week of parties, including a $1,000-a-head pig roast. b. introduced a lottery system for tickets after the rush to buy them crashed its servers. c. Began charging nonresidents $7 for admission to one of its most popular attractions. d. raised more than $330,000 for charity in just one day, despite bad weather. san francisco January 2012 32 1. c. We beat out both los angeles and new york as vainest city in america. 2. d. reportedly, between base salary, unused vacation time/sick days, and miscellaneous “other pay,” fong’s total earnings for 2009 were $528,595. She’ll also get a pension of $287,376 a year for the rest of her life. We’d comment, but it’s hard to type through tears. 3. a. Berkeley, where 10 percent of households live on $10,000 a year or less. 4. b. though we’re hoping that if we look hard enough, we’ll eventually find c. as well. 5. b. the yahoo! sign, once retro-futurist but now just retro, was scheduled for removal at the end of the year. Before yahoo!, the sign belonged to the industry Standard. remember them? 6. d. Did we mention that thiel is a libertarian? 7. false . that dismaying distinction goes to the San Jose metro area. But don’t worry: We’re number two, and we’re trying harder. 8. false . We’re not even the best-educated city in the Bay area. that honor goes to Palo alto, where 8 out of 10 residents aged 25 or older hold a bachelor’s degree. When it comes to college degrees, we don’t even make the state’s top 10. 9. b. 10. c. 11. d. 12. a. answer key

City Life

2011 Our Year Of Living Paradoxically. <br /> <br /> Remember when San Francisco buzzed with innovation, invention, and the fear that we were losing our character to an invasion of baby-faced technocrats? When rents spiraled out of control, a new fusion restaurant opened every seven minutes, and instant moguls bought Potrero Hill flats with startup cash? Yes, we're talking about 2011.<br /> <br /> As the country faced the worst economy since the great depression, san francisco partied like it was 1999, with a new tech boom that was bringing in yet another generation of sharp twenty somethings with big ideas and bigger wallets. On the other hand, if you weren't an entrepreneur, a programmer, or a recently retired city employee (see question no. 2), you probably spent the year sucking it up with the rest of us: cursing Muni, losing the public school lottery, and wondering if it was time to move back in with your parents. Here, test your knowledge of this whiplash-inducing year. Sheerly Avni<br /> <br /> Vive la Diy-cycle!<br /> <br /> In which a tool-shy bike lover discovers that the do-it-yourself movement may be misnamed.<br /> <br /> Since moving to San Francisco, I'd followed the DIY movement wistfully, nose pressed to the glass. I baked bread. I grew tomatoes. But build something? I was sure I couldn't. Which was too bad, because I'd always harbored a secret desire to be a compagnon, one of those elite journeymen who since medieval times have toured France town by town, practicing crafts from stonemasonry to boilermaking to patisserie. I could see that San Francisco's artisans and diyers had the same pragmatism and fraternal spirit, but a compagnon's rigorous training-that seemed unachievable to a bookworm who could barely knock in a picture hook.<br /> <br /> Then one day, a block from my apartment, i stumbled onto the bamboo bike studio, which has been holding bike-building workshops since December 2010-growing, largely by word of mouth, until classes now sell out months in advance. BBS is DIY, serves the global community (one of the first local shops to use sustainably grown bamboo for its frames; helped build a bamboo bike factory in Ghana), and is rigorous, mais oui. Weekend workshops run for up to 40 hours. I was a biker in need of a bike, so I took the DIY plunge.<br /> <br /> Justin Aguinaldo, former champion bike messenger, now BBS's designer and S.F. studio head, made it easy: I'd build a Coaster, an affordable basic model ($750) with room for added features. But I couldn't get Friday off, so I arrived at 8 a.m. On Saturday-to find my classmates hours ahead of me. No matter. While Justin showed them how to bind the lug joints to the bamboo shafts, I assembled my frame, using a plane measure, sight, and touch to position each shaft. Then Justin set me to shaping my lugs (made of very tough balsa wood) using hand files, a task that took most of a 13-hour day. Compagnon lesson number one: Apprentices don't need experience or skills, just patience-medieval patience.<br /> <br /> As we newbies toiled, alumni wandered in. One was finishing two bikes: wedding gifts for his sister and her fiancé. These journeymen helped me with tips and practical support-one doing as much shaping on my toughest lug in 15 minutes as I had in three hours. I was grateful: I would have done it alone, but now I could coat my lugs with fiberglass before we stopped for the night.<br /> <br /> Compagnon lesson number two: Liberté, but even more, fraternité.<br /> <br /> Sunday I graduated to resin-soaked carbon tape, wrapping the lugs in intricate patterns to optimize the joints' strength. I wouldn't finish that night, but I cheered as one of my companions wheeled a complete bike out in glory.<br /> <br /> This weekend I was back in the studio, filing away at the hardened carbon and making friends with a new workshop gang, and heard that the night before, a man cruising by in his car had rolled down the window and shouted, "You make bamboo bikes here?" Yes, he was told. "That's unpossible!" He exclaimed, and sped off in his steel box. He was wrong. All bikes are possible, including mine, thanks to what BBS taught me: It's not DIY. It's DIYT- Do It Yourself, Together. N Jane halsey 982 post St., S.f., bamboobikestudio.com

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