SANF January, 2012 : Page 36

the talk fOOD art he dignifi ed mud when stephen de staebler studied sculpture at uC berkeley in the late 1950s, no material was more scorned than ordinary clay. museums deemed ceramics a craft, useful enough for making pots, but too crude for high artistic expression. over the next decade a couple dozen bay area artists brought international acclaim to the region by upending this old shibboleth. though de staebler was not the best-known member of this so-called Cali fornia clay movement, his fi rst retrospective, at the de young—opening a mere eight months after his death last may—and a concurrent exhibit of just his later work, at dolby Chadwick gallery, show that he was among the best. more than any other ceramicist of his era, de staebler understood that clay comes from the earth and that it can be sculpted in ways that mimic the geologic processes that formed it. he practically invented his own art form by beating and buckling tons of clay into awesome mountainous land-scapes, but his human sculptures are also very moving. in his late fi gurative works, such as Figure with Lost Torso (2008), the artist acted as a sort of archaeologist, digging into his personal “boneyard” of broken fragments from past sculptures to assemble life-size bodies as hauntingly fragile and incomplete as prehistoric fossils. n JOnAthOn KeAtS “Matter + SPirit: the SculPture Of StePhen De StaeBler”: Jan. 14–aPril 22, De yOunG MuSeuM, 50 haGiWara tea GarDen Dr., S.f., 415-750-3600, DeyOunG.faMSf.OrG. thrOuGh Jan. 28, DOlBy chaDWick Gallery, 210 POSt St., Ste. 205, S.f., 415-956-3560, DOlBychaDWickGallery.cOM THe source THe “grub” among other curiosities, this eclectic shop stocks insect candy from hotlix, including chocolate-covered ants , crickets , and mealworms . wHy dig in mealworms taste like popcorn, and crickets are “cereal-y,” says manager diana mansfi eld. “the only problem is that cricket legs can get stuck in your teeth.” there’s a bug in your food Actually, it is your food. Bon appétit. Take a local culture that’s forever on the hunt for new things to eat, add in our health con-sciousness and our eco-guilt, and it’s no sur-prise that eating insects should be in vogue . They’re exotic, they’re full of protein, and their production requires far fewer resources than that of meat. Also, the practice of eating bugs now has a glamorous spokesperson, San Mateo resident Daniella Martin, the anthro-pologist-turned-entomophagist author of the blog Girl Meets Bug, where you can learn everything you ever wanted to know (or didn’t) about the history, logistics, and art of dining on creepy-crawlies. For now, edible insects are more a niche specialty than a reg-ular menu item, but we’ve found fi ve places that make the case for overcoming the ick fac-tor and learning to bug out. n OliviA mArtin the Bone room 1569 SOlanO aVe., Berkeley, 510-526-5252, BOnerOOM.cOM Kang tong 3702 teleGraPh aVe., OaklanD, 510-658-2998 “spicy chrysalis soup,” made with silkworms , zucchini, and onions and served in a clay pot. according to one adventurous diner, silkworms taste surprisingly like shrimp in their shells. mezcal 25 W. San fernanDO St., San JOSe, 408-283-9595, MezcalreStau rantSJ. cOM an appetizer of chapulines, or grasshoppers sautéed in garlic, lime, and salt and served with guacamole and tortilla chips. “they taste like fl avored sunfl ower seeds,” reports bartender brian roy. C o u rte sy o f d o lby C hadw i C k galle ry Don Bugito keeP track Of DOn BuGitO’S fOOD truck Via tWitter @DOnBuGitOSf san francisco January 2012 Wax moth larvae tacos on handmade blue corn tortillas, with pickled onions. “the larvae are fed a diet of organic bran and honey, so they taste nutty, sort of like chicharrones,” says owner mónica martínez. Petco 2300 16th St., S.f., 415-255-7156, PetcO.cOM live crickets , mealworms , and wax worms . for culinary diyers, pet stores carry insects safe for human consumption. Just pop the container in the freezer for a night. “bugs are ectotherms, so freezing puts them into stasis,” explains martin, whose blog offers many recipes-cum–conversation pieces, like the bee-lt, made with drone larvae that martin says taste “very much like bacon.” 36

Art

He Dignified Mud<br /> <br /> When stephen de staebler studied sculpture at uC berkeley in the late 1950s, no material was more scorned than ordinary clay. Museums deemed ceramics a craft, useful enough for making pots, but too crude for high artistic expression. Over the next decade a couple dozen bay area artists brought international acclaim to the region by upending this old shibboleth. Though de staebler was not the best-known member of this so-called Cali fornia clay movement, his first retrospective, at the de young—opening a mere eight months after his death last may—and a concurrent exhibit of just his later work, at dolby Chadwick gallery, show that he was among the best. <br /> <br /> More than any other ceramicist of his era, de staebler understood that clay comes from the earth and that it can be sculpted in ways that mimic the geologic processes that formed it. He practically invented his own art form by beating and buckling tons of clay into awesome mountainous landscapes, but his human sculptures are also very moving. In his late figurative works, such as Figure with Lost Torso (2008), the artist acted as a sort of archaeologist, digging into his personal "boneyard" of broken fragments from past sculptures to assemble life-size bodies as hauntingly fragile and incomplete as prehistoric fossils. N jonathon keats "Matter + Spirit: the sculpture Of stephen De staebler": Jan. 14-april 22, De young museum, 50 hagiwara tea garden Dr., S.f., 415-750-3600, deyoung.famsf.org. Through Jan. 28, dolby chadwick Gallery, 210 post St., Ste. 205, S.f., 415-956-3560, dolbychadwickgallery.com

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