WASH December 2010 : Page 24

THE RADAR | NOW! 24 | SCOOP Art Basel Miami: 5 Artists to Watch! The art smart have fi nally gotten the message that Washington has a thriving scene beyond the Smithsonians. This month, fi ve breakout artists will show up at Art Basel Miami Beach and prove fi rsthand why the District is a serious contender in the international world of contemporary art. –E. Brady Robinson EYE POPPERS Clockwise from left: Head to Miami to see more than a few of DC’s art stars. Photographer Jason Horowitz turns his lens on the facial contours of crossdressers. Jonathan Monaghan leverages CGI technology to create images that convey the vivid details of intense dreams. Erik Thor Sandberg paints allegorical works that merge motifs from multiple periods in the history of portraiture. lot of success at SCOPE Miami,” says Hamiltonian director Jacqueline Ionita. “Most importantly, the show has helped us get the work of our fellows into museums and international collections. We expect no less for Jonathan.” JASON HOROWITZ TREVOR YOUNG ERIK THOR SANDBERG CHANDI KELLEY Where to nd him in DC: Civilian Art Projects Where to nd him in Miami: SCOPE Why you’ll be glad you did: “Trevor Young is making all new work for the show—large scale oil paintings all in a palette of blues and blacks depicting his signature non-places— airports, gas stations, highways” says Jayme McLellan, director of the District’s Civilian Art Projects. “It’s Trevor’s rst time doing a solo booth,” she says. “I feel he’s making his best work now.” Where to nd him in DC: Conner Contemporary Art Where to nd him in Miami: PULSE Why you’ll be glad you did: Miami Basel vet Leigh Conner of Conner Contemporary has been exhibiting here each December since 2002. is year she brings Sandberg for the rst time. e artist is known for his paintings of allegorical narratives, which employ strong visual structures containing personal and contemporary symbolism. “Miami is one of the biggest and best platforms in the world to present new work by artists,” Conner says. “It’s very important to show only the newest and most forward-thinking works in our program. Sandberg is a perfect t this year.” JONATHAN MONAGHAN Where to nd him in DC: Hamiltonian Gallery Where to nd him in Miami: SCOPE Miami Why you’ll be glad you did: Monaghan makes slick, fantastical images, created using the same CGI software that Pixar uses. “We’ve enjoyed a Where to nd him in DC: Curator’s O ce Where to nd him in Miami: PULSE Why you’ll be glad you did: His bold photographic work of extreme close-ups focusing on drag queens from DC explores the intersection of landscape and portraiture in a daring way. “I think that the Miami fairs can get to be a bit much at times,” says the rising shooting star. “But there really isn’t any place better for getting your work in front of such a large and important part of the art world all at once.” Where to nd her in DC: DC Art Center’s Sparkplug Where to nd her in Miami: Salon Corcoran at NADA (New Art Dealers Alliance) Why you’ll be glad you did: Her phantasmagorical photographs of antique books juxtaposed with vintage wallpaper give a sense of nostalgia, have an air of mystery and become the basis for visual narratives. Salon Corcoran will take place in the entrance of the Deauville Beach Resort in North Miami and will serve as a site for Corcoran members, alums, artists, students and friends to gather and connect during Art Basel Miami Beach. LOOK BOOK Seasonal Order The fashion world has had a love affair with the Toledos almost as long as the couple’s own. Nordstrom fêtes the designing wife’s artist husband this month by publishing Ruben Toledo’s Fashion Almanac, with a foreword by Anna Wintour. Nordstrom’s in-house illustrator for ten years inks up 128 pages of stunning seasonal pret-a-porter looks from this era’s hottest designers. $65, at Nordstrom, Bethesda and Tysons Corner . –Karen Sommer Shalett | December 2010

The Radar Now!

<b>Art Basel Miami: 5 Artists to Watch!</b><br /> <br /> The art smart have finally gotten the message that Washington has a thriving scene beyond the Smithsonians. This month, five breakout artists will show up at Art Basel Miami Beach and prove firsthand why the District is a serious contender in the international world of contemporary art. <br /> <br /> –E. Brady Robinson<br /> <br /> <b>TREVOR YOUNG </b><br /> <br /> Where to find him in DC: Civilian Art Projects Where to find him in Miami: SCOPE Why you’ll be glad you did: “Trevor Young is making all new work for the show—large scale oil paintings all in a palette of blues and blacks depicting his signature non-places— airports, gas stations, highways” says Jayme McLellan, director of the District’s Civilian Art Projects. “It’s Trevor’s first time doing a solo booth,” she says. “I feel he’s making his best work now.”<br /> <br /> <b>ERIK THOR SANDBERG </b><br /> <br /> Where to find him in DC: Conner Contemporary Art Where to find him in Miami: PULSE Why you’ll be glad you did: Miami Basel vet Leigh Conner of Conner Contemporary has been exhibiting here each December since 2002. This year she brings Sandberg for the first time. The artist is known for his paintings of allegorical narratives, which employ strong visual structures containing personal and contemporary symbolism. “Miami is one of the biggest and best platforms in the world to present new work by artists,” Conner says. “It’s very important to show only the newest and most forward-thinking works in our program. Sandberg is a perfect fit this year.”<br /> <br /> <b>JONATHAN MONAGHAN </b><br /> <br /> Where to find him in DC: Hamiltonian Gallery Where to find him in Miami: SCOPE Miami Why you’ll be glad you did: Monaghan makes slick, fantastical images, created using the same CGI software that Pixar uses. “We’ve enjoyed a lot of success at SCOPE Miami,” says Hamiltonian director Jacqueline Ionita. “Most importantly, the show has helped us get the work of our fellows into museums and international collections. We expect no less for Jonathan.”<br /> <br /> <b>JASON HOROWITZ </b><br /> <br /> Where to find him in DC: Curator’s Office Where to find him in Miami: PULSE Why you’ll be glad you did: His bold photographic work of extreme close-ups focusing on drag queens from DC explores the intersection of landscape and portraiture in a daring way. “I think that the Miami fairs can get to be a bit much at times,” says the rising shooting star. “But there really isn’t any place better for getting your work in front of such a large and important part of the art world all at once.”<br /> <br /> <b>CHANDI KELLEY</b><br /> <br /> Where to find her in DC: DC Art Center’s Sparkplug Where to .. nd her in Miami: Salon Corcoran at NADA (New Art Dealers Alliance) Why you’ll be glad you did: Her phantasmagorical photographs of antique books juxtaposed with vintage wallpaper give a sense of nostalgia, have an air of mystery and become the basis for visual narratives. Salon Corcoran will take place in the entrance of the Deauville Beach Resort in North Miami and will serve as a site for Corcoran members, alums, artists, students and friends to gather and connect during Art Basel Miami Beach.<br /> <br /> <b>LOOK BOOK<br /> <br /> Seasonal Order</b><br /> <br /> The fashion world has had a love affair with the Toledos almost as long as the couple’s own. Nordstrom fêtes the designing wife’s artist husband this month by publishing Ruben Toledo’s Fashion Almanac, with a foreword by Anna Wintour. Nordstrom’s in-house illustrator for ten years inks up 128 pages of stunning seasonal pret-a-porter looks from this era’s hottest designers. $65, at Nordstrom, Bethesda and Tysons Corner. <br /> <br /> –Karen Sommer Shalett<br /> <br /> <b>Q&A<br /> <br /> Show Me the Funny!</b><br /> <br /> Jason Weems is a comedy machine. He performs four nights a week, from Baltimore to DC, and has ranked high on NBC’s Last Comic Standing. On December 4, he will film a comedy special, Vol. 1: Intellectual Property, at The LOF/t in Baltimore. The punchline? He teaches kindergarten in Baltimore during the day. Teacher by day, comedian by night—Jason Weems is the superhero of jokes. <br /> <br /> –Evan Schwartz<br /> <br /> Tell me a joke. I used to keep my jokes on a piece of paper in a Ziploc bag. I thought they wouldn’t be fresh and I was trying to keep the funny in! Describe your style. I make sure my set feels like affuid stream of consciousness—you don’t know where one joke starts and another joke ends. How are you different from other comedians? I turn material over like crazy. If you come see me on a Wednesday night and then a Thursday night, you’ll hear a completely different set. How does DC compare as a comedy town to New York or LA? In certain towns, you have to dumb down your material. Not here. It’s a great place to cut your teeth. That’s why Dave Chappelle, Tommy Davidson and Wanda Sykes are from here. Do your kindergartners find you funny? They’re 5. They laugh at pretty much anything. But sometimes I’ll say something in front of the grown up crowd, and they’ll love it. Then I’ll say it in front of the kids, and they’re like, "Nope!"<br /> <br /> <b>HOLIDAY HIP<br /> <br /> Designs of the Times </b><br /> <br /> It is hardly a shonda anymore for a family to celebrate both Christmas and Hanukkah. Design teams are stepping up to allow your aesthetic for one to reach the other. No Hanukkah bushes here! Instead find independent items that allow each holiday to stand hiply on its own. <br /> <br /> –K.S.S.<br /> <br /> <b>POLIT-ARAZZI<br /> <br /> About To Blow Up!</b><br /> <br /> The Who has Tommy, Green Day has American Idiot, and now DC band Dirty Bomb has King of the Hill, a rock opera ode to Jack Abramoff. Reuters reporter Andy Sullivan wrote the songs after covering the infamous lobbyist’s trial, then formed a group with his colleagues. Their debut record—dropped the same month as Abramoff’s prison release and coincidentally the premiere of the film Casino Jack—tells “a classic rise and fall narrative” through meaty lyrics and ACDC-like power chords. Originally intending to create a Broadway musical, Sullivan wrote an album with as many emotional hooks as guitar riffs. “There’s perhaps a little bit of Jack Abramoff in us all,” he says. <br /> <br /> – Lauren Sloat<br /> <br /> <b>PETAL PUSHERS<br /> <br /> In Full Bloom</b><br /> <br /> The economy might not be a bed of roses, but H.BLOOM just received an infusion of capital to help it launch in the nation’s capital. Aiming to revolutionize flowers the way Netfix changed movies, the luxurious Internetbased florist —formerly serving NYC only—is bringing its deluxe, subscription delivery style to Washington. From exotic orchids to local annuals, former Urban Petals wonder-designer Sarah von Pollaro is assembling dazzling collections for both residential and corporate clients to spearhead the launch. Tempted? Select from arrange-your-own, pre-arranged and customized stem collections brought straight to your door on a set schedule for just $25 a bouquet. Hbloom.Com <br /> <br /> –Emily K. Schwartz<br /> <br /> <b>MARKET WATCH<br /> <br /> Unforgettable Hue</b><br /> <br /> Color, what a tease! Whose eye hasn’t been turned by an intense shade, only to shy away from a love match for fear of making a big mistake? Furniture manufacturers at the autumn High Point Market in North Carolina took a chance on chromatic commitment, and so can you. <br /> <br /> –Connie Dufner<br /> <br /> <b>BROAD STROKES<br /> <br /> Making a Splash</b><br /> <br /> The son of DC mogul Jay Nussbaum and interior designer Patricia was born to be an entrepreneurial artist. After studying art at the University of Alabama, Drew Nussbaum (drewnussbaum.com) set off to paint the world. The figurative and abstract painter later set down his palette to follow in his father’s footsteps, until fate stepped in. Losing his mother in 2009, Nussbaum turned back to his brushes to combat depression. This month, nearly 100 pieces hit four different sets of DC-area walls, marking the most prolific era of Nussbaum’s career. <br /> <br /> – K.S.S.<br /> <br /> <b>Get Carded</b><br /> <br /> When Texas-native Heidi Kallett was looking for career inspiration, she turned to her girlfriends—and wine. Kallett now runs The Dandelion Patch, a fine stationery boutique with locations in Vienna, Leesburg, Reston and most recently Georgetown. We caught up with this mother of two to ask about her passion for paper. <br /> <br /> – Christina Holevas<br /> <br /> Why come to the Dandelion Patch rather than double-click? The store is warm and welcoming. In a society that is so focused on technology, we want to help make life personal. In such a fast-paced era, is longevity a factor? The days when people sent a custom invitation for a backyard barbeque are over. We focus on milestones—events that you are going to want to scrapbook and remember forever. How do you keep things spirited during the holidays? When you get 300 emails a week, it’s nice to see a special letter in your mailbox. Letter press cards make the holidays feel more special, unique, personal. What can the savvy set find in your new Georgetown Park store? I scour the countryside for the perfect hostess, baby shower, teacher, children’s gifts. It’s about foregoing the bottle of wine and showing up to the party with something you’re proud to give and the hostess is thrilled to receive.<br /> <br />

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